Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Cancer Treatment May Trigger Cognitive Problems

Date:
June 3, 2005
Source:
University Of Southern California
Summary:
Cancer survivors are twice as likely to develop cognitive problems as individuals who have never been treated for cancer, according to an article in the June 1 Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Cancer survivors are twice as likely to develop cognitive problems as individuals who have never been treated for cancer, according to an article in the June 1 Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Previous research has raised concerns about a possible link among cancer, cancer therapies and cognitive dysfunction. This USC study found that long-term cancer survivors were at increased risk of cognitive impairment.

An accompanying editorial urged a cautious interpretation of the results pending further research on the subject.

In the study, USC psychologists studied 702 cancer survivors and their cancer-free twins in the Swedish Twin Registry.

Studying twins statistically removes genetic or early childhood causes of both cancer and cognitive deficits.

Working with colleagues at the Karolinska Institute and Gothenberg University in Sweden, the researchers evaluated the survivors through a standardized mental status interview.

Participants were scored on a scale from zero to three. Anyone who scored a three, defined as having verbal, orientation or recall problems that interfere with daily life, was considered to have cognitive dysfunction.

"The twin who had cancer was more likely to have some sort of cognitive dysfunction," said Beth Meyerowitz, professor of psychology in the USC College of Letters, Arts and Sciences. About 15 percent of the cancer survivors in the study showed cognitive dysfunction.

Previous studies have found cognitive problems in short-term cancer survivors, said coauthor Lara Heflin, a doctoral student in psychology at USC. This study is the first to find significant cognitive differences between long-term survivors and cancer-free individuals, she said, and to focus on older adult survivors.

"This suggests that possibly the cognitive dysfunction gets worse over time with increased survival duration," Heflin said.

The comparison with cancer-free twins means that the increased dysfunction cannot be attributed to the normal aging process.

The researchers also found a doubled risk of dementia in the survivor group. However, the result was not statistically significant.

Heflin plans to study patient data from Los Angeles County's Cancer Surveillance Project and USC's Alzheimer Disease Research Center to investigate the possible link between dementia and cancer.

The study does not suggest a cause for the cognitive problems in cancer survivors. The JNCI study excluded survivors of tumors that directly affect the central nervous system.

One possibility is that chemotherapy or other cancer treatments may cause long-term damage. The researchers plan a follow-up study comparing survivors who received different treatments.

"If, five, eight, 10 years down the line, having had that treatment is going to increase a person's risk of dementia, that's something that should be considered by the physician and the patient," Meyerowitz said. "Maybe a lower dose might be useful for the cancer but would reduce risk of cognitive dysfunction."

"Those with cancer might also be advised to have their cognition monitored as part of long-term follow-up," added Margaret Gatz, professor of psychology at USC and foreign adjunct professor of medical epidemiology and biostatistics at the Karolinska Institute.

Funding for this research came from the National Institute on Aging and the national Alzheimer's Association.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Southern California. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Southern California. "Cancer Treatment May Trigger Cognitive Problems." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 June 2005. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050603061553.htm>.
University Of Southern California. (2005, June 3). Cancer Treatment May Trigger Cognitive Problems. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050603061553.htm
University Of Southern California. "Cancer Treatment May Trigger Cognitive Problems." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050603061553.htm (accessed August 22, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, August 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) An experimental drug used to treat Marburg virus in rhesus monkeys could give new insight into a similar treatment for Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Two US Ebola Patients Leave Hospital Free of the Disease

Two US Ebola Patients Leave Hospital Free of the Disease

AFP (Aug. 21, 2014) Two American missionaries who were sickened with Ebola while working in Liberia and were treated with an experimental drug are doing better and have left the hospital, doctors say on August 21, 2014. Duration: 01:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cadavers, a Teen, and a Medical School Dream

Cadavers, a Teen, and a Medical School Dream

AP (Aug. 21, 2014) Contains graphic content. He's only 17. But Johntrell Bowles has wanted to be a doctor from a young age, despite the odds against him. He was recently the youngest participant in a cadaver program at the Indiana University NW medical school. (Aug. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
American Ebola Patients Released: What Cured Them?

American Ebola Patients Released: What Cured Them?

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) It's unclear whether the American Ebola patients' recoveries can be attributed to an experimental drug or early detection and good medical care. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins