Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Mathematical Tools For Predicting Facial Surgery Results

Date:
September 28, 2006
Source:
American Mathematical Society
Summary:
In their article "Mathematics in Facial Surgery," Peter Deuflhard, Martin Weiser and Stefan Zachow, of the Konrad Zuse Zentrum, Berlin, describe the mathematical techniques they have used to assist cranio-maxillofacial surgeons to predict the outcomes of surgery. These techniques have proven to be quite successful in producing predictions that end up matching well the post-operative outcomes.

Cranio-maxillofacial surgery is a medical specialty focusing on facial and skull reconstruction. This surgery can help patients with such disorders as cleft palate, malformations of the upper or lower jaw, and problems with the facial skeleton due to injury. Intensive pre-operative planning is needed not only to ensure that the medical purposes of the surgery are achieved, but also to give patients a sense of what their faces will look like after the surgery is performed.

In their article "Mathematics in Facial Surgery," Peter Deuflhard, Martin Weiser, and Stefan Zachow (of the Konrad Zuse Zentrum (ZIB), Berlin) describe the mathematical techniques they have used to assist cranio-maxillofacial surgeons to predict the outcomes of surgery. These techniques have proven to be quite successful in producing predictions that end up matching well the post-operative outcomes.

The first step in the planning paradigm for such surgery is to use medical imaging data of the patient to construct a 3-dimensional computer model, called the "virtual patient". The second step, which is the one the article focuses on, uses the data to create a "virtual lab" in which various operative strategies can be tested. The last step is to play back to the patient the outcomes of the various strategies.

The second step in the paradigm requires modeling and solving partial differential equations (PDEs), which are equations that represent changing physical systems. One must identify which PDEs are appropriate for biomechanical modeling of soft facial tissue and bone. Standard methods for handling the equations need to be adapted for this particular application. One must also formulate ways to represent the interface between tissue and bone, as well as their interactions. Generally such PDEs cannot be solved exactly in closed form, so mathematics enters the picture once again to provide numerical techniques for producing approximate solutions.

With the "virtual patient" data as input, one can use the approximate solutions to generate an individualized model for that particular patient. The surgeons can then use the model as a "virtual lab" to predict the effects of surgical procedures and options, and patients can get a picture of approximately how they will look after the surgery.

The article by Deuflhard et al states that qualitative comparisons between the outcomes predicted by the model, and the actual surgical outcomes, have been surprisingly good. The authors have also made quantitative comparisons, by creating a post-operative model of the patient and comparing it quantitatively to the predicted outcome. They found a mean prediction error of between 1 and 1.5mm for the soft tissue, which they write "seems to be a fully acceptable result."

"Even though biomechanical tissue modeling turns out to be a tough problem, we are already rather successful in predicting postoperative appearance from preoperative patient data," the authors write. "For the surgeon, our computer assisted planning permits an improved preparation before the actual operation."

The article "Mathematics in Facial Surgery" appears in the October 2006 issue of the Notices of the AMS. It is available on the web at http://www.ams.org/notices/200609/fea-surgery.pdf

Founded in 1888 to further mathematical research and scholarship, the more than 30,000-member American Mathematical Society fulfills its mission through programs and services that promote mathematical research and its uses, strengthen mathematical education, and foster awareness and appreciation of mathematics and its connections to other disciplines and to everyday life.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Mathematical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Mathematical Society. "Mathematical Tools For Predicting Facial Surgery Results." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 September 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060926104459.htm>.
American Mathematical Society. (2006, September 28). Mathematical Tools For Predicting Facial Surgery Results. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060926104459.htm
American Mathematical Society. "Mathematical Tools For Predicting Facial Surgery Results." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/09/060926104459.htm (accessed April 17, 2014).

Share This



More Computers & Math News

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

German Researchers Crack Samsung's Fingerprint Scanner

German Researchers Crack Samsung's Fingerprint Scanner

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) German researchers have used a fake fingerprint made from glue to bypass the fingerprint security system on Samsung's new Galaxy S5 smartphone. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Twitter, Apple Social Data Purchases Likely to Spur More Mergers and Acquisitions

Twitter, Apple Social Data Purchases Likely to Spur More Mergers and Acquisitions

TheStreet (Apr. 16, 2014) The social media data space is likely to see more mergers and acquisitions following Twitter Inc.'s acquisition of tweet analyzer Gnip Inc. on Tuesday and Apples Inc.'s purchase of Topsy Labs Inc. back in December. One firm in particular, the U.K.'s DataSift Inc., could be on the list of potential buyers. Among other social media startups that could be ripe for picking is Banjo, whose mobile app provides aggregated content by topic and location. Banjo could also be a good fit for Twitter. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com
Bitcoin Exchange Mt. Gox to Liquidate After Rebuilding Rejected

Bitcoin Exchange Mt. Gox to Liquidate After Rebuilding Rejected

TheStreet (Apr. 16, 2014) Bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox has agreed to liquidate after a Japanese court rejected its plans to rebuild, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal. Mt. Gox filed for bankruptcy protection in February after announcing about 850,000 bitcoins, worth around $454 million at today's rates, may have been stolen by hackers. It has since recovered 200,000 of the missing bitcoins. The court put Mt. Gox's assets under a provisional administrator's control until bankruptcy proceedings begin. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com
BlackBerry: The Crash That Launched 1,000 Startups

BlackBerry: The Crash That Launched 1,000 Startups

Reuters - Business Video Online (Apr. 16, 2014) Tech startups in BlackBerry's hometown of Waterloo, Ontario, are tapping talent from the struggling smartphone company and filling the void left in the region by its meltdown. Reuters correspondent Euan Rocha visits the region that could become Canada's Silicon Valley. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins