Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Racial Disparity In Breast Cancer Outcome Linked To Aggressive Tumors

Date:
October 23, 2006
Source:
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Summary:
Malignancies of the breast can be more aggressive and associated with poorer outcome in African-Americans than other races, according to a new study. The study reviewed patient data from two different clinical trial protocols -- to control for healthcare access biases -- and found that African-Americans have tumors with poorer prognostic cellular characteristics and more aggressive clinical presentations, pointing to the possibility that racially influenced tumor biology may contribute to observed racial disparities in breast cancer outcome.

Malignancies of the breast can be more aggressive and associated with poorer outcome in African-Americans than other races, according to a new study. Published in the December 1, 2006 issue of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study reviewed patient data from two different clinical trial protocols -- to control for healthcare access biases -- and found that African-Americans have tumors with poorer prognostic cellular characteristics and more aggressive clinical presentations, pointing to the possibility that racially influenced tumor biology may contribute to observed racial disparities in breast cancer outcome.

Population-based studies have demonstrated significant differences in breast cancer survival rates based on race, particularly among African-Americans who are more likely to die of their disease than Caucasians. However, other races have been poorly studied. An often hypothesized explanation is socioeconomic differences that impact healthcare and access. Recent data suggest, however, that there may be differences in the tumors at the cellular level that may contribute to poor clinical presentations and outcomes.

Led by Wendy A. Woodward, M.D. of the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, researchers reviewed medical records and outcome data from 2,140 Caucasian, Hispanic and African-American breast cancer patients enrolled in clinical trials, controlling for differences in treatment that compromise other studies. Patients were either treated with chemotherapy before (neoadjuvant) or after (adjuvant) mastectomy.

The researchers found that in both treatment groups African-American race was independently associated with poor tumor and clinical characteristics and low survival rates compared to both Caucasian-Hispanic cohorts. For example, African-Americans presented with more advanced disease and were likely to have estrogen-receptor negative tumors. Analysis to control for other confounding factors confirmed that African-American race by itself was associated with lower survival in both treatment groups.

This study, conclude the authors, supports previous data "that African-American women more frequently had ER-negative disease and high-grade tumors and that African-American race was associated with a poorer survival rate." This was confirmed in "two independent data sets of patients treated on prospective protocols."

Article: "African-American Race Is Associated With a Poorer Overall Survival Rate for Breast Cancer Patients Treated with Mastectomy and Doxorubicin-Based Chemotherapy," WA Woodward, EH Huang, MD McNeese, GH Perkins, SL Tucker, EA Strom, L Middleton, K Hahn, GN Hortobagyi, TA Buchholz, CANCER; Published Online: October 23, 2006 (DOI: 10.1002/cncr.22281); Print Issue Date: December 1, 2006.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. "Racial Disparity In Breast Cancer Outcome Linked To Aggressive Tumors." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 October 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061023091515.htm>.
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. (2006, October 23). Racial Disparity In Breast Cancer Outcome Linked To Aggressive Tumors. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061023091515.htm
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.. "Racial Disparity In Breast Cancer Outcome Linked To Aggressive Tumors." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/10/061023091515.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, July 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

AP (July 28, 2014) Classes are being offered nationwide to encourage African Americans to learn about cooking fresh foods based on traditional African cuisine. The program is trying to combat obesity, heart disease and other ailments often linked to diet. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
West Africa Gripped by Deadly Ebola Outbreak

West Africa Gripped by Deadly Ebola Outbreak

AFP (July 28, 2014) The worst-ever outbreak of the deadly Ebola epidemic grips west Africa, killing hundreds. Duration: 00:48 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A national study conducted by the USDA Forest Service found that trees collectively save more than 850 lives on an annual basis. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google's Next Frontier: The Human Body

Google's Next Frontier: The Human Body

Newsy (July 27, 2014) Google is collecting genetic and molecular information to paint a picture of the perfectly healthy human. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins