Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Family And Friends Set The Speedometer

Date:
January 5, 2007
Source:
Queensland University of Technology
Summary:
If your family and friends approve of speeding, then chances are you are more likely to plant your foot on the accelerator, a study by Queensland University of Technology has found.

QUT research Judy Fleiter studies who influences us to speed.
Credit: Image courtesy of Queensland University of Technology

If your family and friends approve of speeding, then chances are you are more likely to plant your foot on the accelerator, a study by Queensland University of Technology has found.

Judy Fleiter, from QUT's Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety - Queensland (CARRS-Q), said irrespective of age and gender, drivers who perceived their family and friends as approving of speeding, admitted to speeding more frequently.

"It is not only young drivers who are influenced by their peers or their families to speed, nor is it just males," she said.

Ms Fleiter said previous research suggested that on the road younger drivers and males were more susceptible to peer and family pressure, than older drivers and females.

"This is part of the reason why younger drivers are over-represented in crashes," she said.

"But my findings overall showed that it didn't matter what gender you were or how old you were, if friends and family approved of speeding you were more likely to speed."

Ms Fleiter's study, which was part of her honours degree, was conducted with 320 drivers in south-east Queensland aged 16-79 and looked at the influences on self-reported speeding.

"The study found drivers report more frequent speeding when they perceived greater approval of speeding by family and friends," she said.

"While the impact of friends was found to be the most important influence in this study, it also highlights the role that family members can play.

"Parents have the opportunity to influence the safety of their children by the example they set."

Ms Fleiter said that in further research she had conducted, one young male said, "Growing up, dad always drove faster than mum, so I always thought males drove faster than females".

She said another driver, a man over 50, said "I just assumed everyone speeds".

"The results of this study highlight the impact that social influences appear to have on speeding behaviour and reinforce the need to better understand how influential groups can be harnessed to promote road safety," she said.

"Overall, this research demonstrates that people need to be aware of the way that they can have an influence on other people's behaviour."

And with speed continuing to be one of the major killers on Queensland roads, Ms Fleiter, said it was crucial to understand the reasons that push drivers to exceed the limit.

"During 2005 there were 68 fatalities as a result of speed-related crashes on Queensland roads - representing 21 per cent of Queensland's road toll," she said.

"Speeding also contributes to numerous crashes resulting in serious injury and increases the severity of crashes caused by other factors such as drink-driving and fatigue."

Ms Fleiter's study has led her to undertake a PhD investigating further the factors that influence drivers to speed.

"As part of my PhD research project I will be talking one-on-one with motorists about their driving behaviour and examining the range of factors that influence their decision to speed."

CARRS-Q is part of QUT's Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Queensland University of Technology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Queensland University of Technology. "Family And Friends Set The Speedometer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 January 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/12/061211124215.htm>.
Queensland University of Technology. (2007, January 5). Family And Friends Set The Speedometer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/12/061211124215.htm
Queensland University of Technology. "Family And Friends Set The Speedometer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/12/061211124215.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Friday, July 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

AFP (July 24, 2014) A so-called drugs rehab 'clinic' is closed down in Pakistan after police find scores of ‘patients’ chained up alleging serial abuse. Duration 03:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can Watching TV Make You Feel Like A Failure?

Can Watching TV Make You Feel Like A Failure?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) A study by German researchers claims watching TV while you're stressed out can make you feel guilty and like a failure. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
China's Ageing Millions Look Forward to Bleak Future

China's Ageing Millions Look Forward to Bleak Future

AFP (July 24, 2014) China's elderly population is expanding so quickly that children struggle to look after them, pushing them to do something unexpected in Chinese society- move their parents into a nursing home. Duration: 02:07 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

    Health News

      Environment News

        Technology News



          Save/Print:
          Share:

          Free Subscriptions


          Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

          Get Social & Mobile


          Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

          Have Feedback?


          Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
          Mobile: iPhone Android Web
          Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
          Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
          Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins