Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Doctors' Extended Duration Work Shifts Are Associated With Medical Errors And Adverse Events

Date:
December 12, 2006
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
A study from the US of doctors in their first postgraduate year (interns) has showed that working extended shifts is associated with increased reporting by the doctors of medical errors, adverse patient events and attentional failures.

A study from the U.S. of doctors in their first postgraduate year (interns) has showed that working extended shifts is associated with increased reporting by the doctors of medical errors, adverse patient events and attentional failures.

The study, published in PLoS Medicine, which was led by Charles Czeisler and Laura Barger from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, included 2737 medical residents, who completed 17,003 monthly reports. In months in which residents worked even one long shift-of 24 hours or more -they were three times more likely to report a fatigue-related significant medical error compared with months in which they worked no extended hours. The rate increased to more than -seven-fold higher in months in which more than five extended shifts were worked.

These errors apparently translated into adverse patient events; even in the months in which residents worked one extended shift they were seven times more likely to report an adverse patient event compared with months when no extended shift was worked. In addition, doctors working more than five extended duration shifts per month reported more attentional failures, (i.e., dozing off) during lectures, during ward rounds and during clinical activities, including surgery, and reported 300 percent more fatigue-related preventable adverse events resulting in the death of the patient.

A recent randomized controlled trial in critical care units showed that the elimination of extended duration work shifts reduced the rates of significant medical and attentional failures in that setting. This new study shows that extended duration shifts worked by a diverse population of interns across the U.S. are also associated with reporting of medical errors, adverse events and attentional failures.

The authors conclude that "These results have important public policy implications for post-graduate medical education."

A Perspective article by Mariana Szklo-Coxe, from the University of Wisconsin, who was not involved in the study, discusses the findings further.

Citation: Barger LK, Ayas NT, Cade BE, Cronin JW, Rosner B, et al. (2006) Impact of extended-duration shifts on medical errors, adverse events, and attentional failures. PLoS Med 3(12): e487. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.0030487)


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Doctors' Extended Duration Work Shifts Are Associated With Medical Errors And Adverse Events." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 December 2006. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/12/061212091906.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2006, December 12). Doctors' Extended Duration Work Shifts Are Associated With Medical Errors And Adverse Events. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/12/061212091906.htm
Public Library of Science. "Doctors' Extended Duration Work Shifts Are Associated With Medical Errors And Adverse Events." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/12/061212091906.htm (accessed August 2, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, August 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Texas Quintuplets Head Home

Texas Quintuplets Head Home

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 1, 2014) After four months in the hospital, the first quintuplets to be born at Baylor University Medical Center head home. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Patient Coming to U.S. for Treatment

Ebola Patient Coming to U.S. for Treatment

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 1, 2014) A U.S. aid worker infected with Ebola while working in West Africa will be treated in a high security ward at Emory University in Atlanta. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Vaccine Might Be Coming, But Where's It Been?

Ebola Vaccine Might Be Coming, But Where's It Been?

Newsy (Aug. 1, 2014) Health officials are working to fast-track a vaccine — the West-African Ebola outbreak has killed more than 700. But why didn't we already have one? Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Links Certain Birth Control Pills To Breast Cancer

Study Links Certain Birth Control Pills To Breast Cancer

Newsy (Aug. 1, 2014) Previous studies have made the link between birth control and breast cancer, but the latest makes the link to high-estrogen oral contraceptives. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins