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Workplace Bullying 50 Percent Higher In US Than Scandinavia

Date:
May 29, 2007
Source:
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Summary:
New research reveals that US employees are bullied up to 50 percent more often than workers in Scandinavia. However, just 9 percent of employees are aware that negative acts they experience constitute bullying, suggesting that bullying behaviour is ingrained in US workplace culture. The study is one of the first to investigate the impact of bullying on non-bullied employees, and finds employees witnessing others being bullied suffer secondary harm.

New research to be published in the Journal of Management Studies reveals that employees in the US are bullied up to 50% more often than workers in Scandinavia. However, just 9% of employees were aware that the negative acts they experienced constituted bullying, suggesting that bullying behaviour is ingrained in the culture of the US workplace.

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The study, led by Pamela Lutgen-Sandvik, is also one of the first to investigate the impact of bullying on non-bullied employees, and finds that the negative effects are widespread: employees who witness others being bullied suffer secondary harm, reporting high levels of stress, and low levels of work satisfaction.

Lutgen-Sandvik explains why this study is so significant: "Workers suffering on the job and thinking they're 'going crazy' learn that the phenomenon has a name, what it looks like, that it happens to many workers, and potentially, what they might do about it."

The study concludes that US organizational and cultural structures frequently enable, trigger, and reward bullying. U.S. companies stress market processes, individualism, and the importance of managers over workers, which discourages collaborative efforts and enables powerful organizational members to bully others without recrimination.

Steven Floyd, an editor at JMS says "This paper helps to surface a problem that plagues far too many employees and that too few people are willing to speak openly about..."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Workplace Bullying 50 Percent Higher In US Than Scandinavia." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 May 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070529112321.htm>.
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. (2007, May 29). Workplace Bullying 50 Percent Higher In US Than Scandinavia. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070529112321.htm
Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. "Workplace Bullying 50 Percent Higher In US Than Scandinavia." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070529112321.htm (accessed November 23, 2014).

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