Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

What's The Fat Content? Whether Or Not You Notice Depends On How You Think

Date:
June 6, 2007
Source:
University of Chicago Press Journals
Summary:
The researchers found that individualists are less affected than collectivists by the context within which products are placed. For example, when a low-fat cookie was grouped with cereal bars and rice cakes in the health food section, collectivists paid more attention to fat content than when the low-fat cookie was shelved taxonomically among all types of cookies. In contrast, individualists perceived the fat content uniformly across contexts.

A new paper by Shailendra Pratap Jain (Indiana University), Kalpesh Kaushik Desai (SUNY Binghamton), and Huifang Mao (University of Central Florida) examines how consumers in individualistic- and collectivistic-oriented societies compare products. For example, do consumers in western societies -- generally thought of as more individualistic -- categorize low-fat cookies or sports cars differently than consumers in eastern societies, considered more collectivistic"

Related Articles


In a study forthcoming in the June issue of the Journal of Consumer Research, the authors tested categorization tendencies through a series of experiments. In the first, participants were analyzed for collectivistic or individualistic tendencies before rating similarities among products. In the second and third, participants were manipulated to tend toward collective thinking or individualistic thinking, and the fourth compared undergraduate students originally from North America and East Asia.

The researchers found that individualists are less affected than collectivists by the context within which products are placed. For example, when a low-fat cookie was grouped with cereal bars and rice cakes in the health food section, collectivists paid more attention to fat content than when the low-fat cookie was shelved taxonomically among all types of cookies. In contrast, individualists perceived the fat content uniformly across contexts.

"Collectivists consider context information in their product categorization more than individualists," the authors write. "Individualists ignore the context and focus only on product features."

The authors conclude: "Our findings fill important gaps in both self-construal and categorization research. An implication of the greater category of membership inclusiveness by individualists is that their stereotypes may be more malleable and less resistant to counter-stereotypical information."

Shailendra Pratap Jain, Kalpesh Kaushik Desai, and Huifang Mao, "The Influence of Chronic and Situational Self-Construal on Categorization." Journal of Consumer Research: June 2007.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Chicago Press Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Chicago Press Journals. "What's The Fat Content? Whether Or Not You Notice Depends On How You Think." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 June 2007. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070604123835.htm>.
University of Chicago Press Journals. (2007, June 6). What's The Fat Content? Whether Or Not You Notice Depends On How You Think. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070604123835.htm
University of Chicago Press Journals. "What's The Fat Content? Whether Or Not You Notice Depends On How You Think." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070604123835.htm (accessed November 22, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Saturday, November 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) Researchers in Beijing discovered a gene called 5-HTA1, and carriers are reportedly 20 percent more likely to be single. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) Researchers find that as people approach new decades in their lives they make bigger life decisions. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
You Don't Have To Be Alcohol Dependent To Need Treatment

You Don't Have To Be Alcohol Dependent To Need Treatment

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) A study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found 9 out of 10 excessive drinkers in the country are not alcohol dependent. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Your Complicated Job Might Keep Your Brain Young

Your Complicated Job Might Keep Your Brain Young

Newsy (Nov. 20, 2014) Researchers at the University of Edinburgh found the more complex your job is, the sharper your cognitive skills will likely be as you age. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins