Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

How Embryonic Livers Store Energy

Date:
February 27, 2008
Source:
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Summary:
Researchers have uncovered how embryonic livers accumulate an important energy molecule even though they lacks the key enzyme responsible. In adults, the liver stores glycogen, a sugar polymer that provides a steady supply of blood glucose when needed (e.g. during fasting). Glycogen production is controlled by an enzyme called glucokinase (GK), and mutations resulting in too much or too little GK will lead to hypo- and hyper-glycemia, respectively.

Researchers have uncovered how embryonic livers accumulate an important energy molecule even though they lacks the key enzyme responsible.

Related Articles


In adults, the liver stores glycogen, a sugar polymer that provides a steady supply of blood glucose when needed (e.g. during fasting). Glycogen production is controlled by an enzyme called glucokinase (GK), and mutations resulting in too much or too little GK will lead to hypo- and hyper-glycemia, respectively.

One interesting biological mystery has been that embryonic livers can store plenty of glycogen, yet they don't produce any GK; the liver only starts making this enzyme after newborns drink their first carbohydrate-rich milk.

Joan Guinovart and colleagues found that embryonic mouse livers circumvent the lack of GK by greatly overproducing (~200 fold higher than adult liver) another enzyme known as hexokinase (HK). Such as high amount is necessary because while HK can make glycogen, it's really inefficient.

However, unlike GK, HK makes glycogen independent of blood-glucose levels, and the researchers confirmed this by fasting pregnant mice and observing the embryonic livers did not alter their glycogen accumulation.

Thus, by using HK, embryos safeguard their glycogen production from any changes in maternal diet to ensure abundant storage. This is critical since glycogen is a newborn's principal source of energy in the critical time between birth and first milk meal.

This research was recently published in the Journal Of Biological Chemistry.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. "How Embryonic Livers Store Energy." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 February 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080222143823.htm>.
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. (2008, February 27). How Embryonic Livers Store Energy. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080222143823.htm
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. "How Embryonic Livers Store Energy." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/02/080222143823.htm (accessed January 31, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, January 31, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

CDC: Get Vaccinated for Measles

CDC: Get Vaccinated for Measles

Reuters - US Online Video (Jan. 30, 2015) The CDC is urging people to get vaccinated for measles amid an outbreak that began at Disneyland and has now infected more than 90 people. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama To Outline New Plan For Personalized Medicine

Obama To Outline New Plan For Personalized Medicine

Newsy (Jan. 30, 2015) President Obama is expected to speak with drugmakers Friday about his Precision Medicine Initiative first introduced last week. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
NFL Concussions Down; Still on Parents' Minds

NFL Concussions Down; Still on Parents' Minds

AP (Jan. 30, 2015) The NFL announced this week that the number of game concussions dropped by a quarter over last season. Still, the dangers of the sport still weigh on players, and parents&apos; minds. (Jan. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.S. Wants to Analyze DNA from 1 Million People

U.S. Wants to Analyze DNA from 1 Million People

Reuters - US Online Video (Jan. 30, 2015) The U.S. has proposed analyzing genetic information from more than 1 million American volunteers to learn how genetic variants affect health and disease. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins