Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Mathematics Simplifies Sleep Monitoring

Date:
May 7, 2008
Source:
University Of Queensland
Summary:
A new way to measure breathing patterns in sleeping infants which may also work for adults has just been created. The researcher has created a mathematical formula that measures varying breathing patterns which indicate different sleep states such as active or quiet sleep.

A UQ researcher has created a new way to measure breathing patterns in sleeping infants which may also work for adults.

The researcher, PhD student Philip Terrill, has created a mathematical formula that measures varying breathing patterns which indicate different sleep states such as active or quiet sleep.

Mr Terrill said a band, placed around the child's chest, recorded breathing rates which were then analysed using the new formula based on the maths of chaos theory.

It has been successfully tested on 30 children so far.

Current sleep monitoring involves an overnight stay in a hospital sleep lab with specialised equipment needing regular attention of a nurse, doctor or sleep technician.

Mr Terrill said he hoped his formula would form the basis of an automated sleep monitoring system that was cheaper and easier to use than current methods. "In the future, diagnosing a sleep problem may be as simple as putting on a breathing monitor during a night's sleep at home, in your own bed," Mr Terrill said.

"This would mean that those children with sleep problems could be quickly diagnosed and treated appropriately."

Minor infant sleeping problems can result in daytime sleepiness and inattention with prolonged problems causing behavioural and learning difficulties.

Mr Terrill said clinical research showed that up to 20 percent of Australian children have symptoms of sleep problems and there were very few facilities available to investigate sleep problems in Queensland children.

He said previous work analysed sleep breathing patterns using conventional statistical methods but his work used techniques from a branch of mathematics called chaos theory. The next step is to test his formula on teenagers and adults.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Queensland. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Queensland. "Mathematics Simplifies Sleep Monitoring." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 May 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080507105644.htm>.
University Of Queensland. (2008, May 7). Mathematics Simplifies Sleep Monitoring. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080507105644.htm
University Of Queensland. "Mathematics Simplifies Sleep Monitoring." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080507105644.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A new study shows sleep deprivation can make it harder for people to remember specific details of an event. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
University Quiz Implies Atheists Are Smarter Than Christians

University Quiz Implies Atheists Are Smarter Than Christians

Newsy (July 25, 2014) An online quiz from a required course at Ohio State is making waves for suggesting atheists are inherently smarter than Christians. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

AFP (July 24, 2014) A so-called drugs rehab 'clinic' is closed down in Pakistan after police find scores of ‘patients’ chained up alleging serial abuse. Duration 03:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins