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Why Do People Vote? Genetic Variation In Political Participation

Date:
June 27, 2008
Source:
American Political Science Association
Summary:
A groundbreaking new study finds that genes significantly affect variation in voter turnout, shedding new light on the reasons why people vote and participate in the political system. The researchers suggest that, contrary to decades of conventional wisdom, family upbringing may have little or no effect on children's future participatory behavior.

A groundbreaking new study finds that genes significantly affect variation in voter turnout, shedding new light on the reasons why people vote and participate in the political system.

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“Although we are not the first to suggest a link between genes and political participation,” note the authors, “this study is the first attempt to test the idea empirically.” They do so by conducting three tests of the claim that part of the variation in political participation can be attributed to genetic factors.

The results suggest that individual genetic differences make up a large and significant portion of the variation in political participation, even after taking socialization and other environmental factors into account. They also suggest that, contrary to decades of conventional wisdom, family upbringing may have little or no effect on children’s future participatory behavior.

In conducting their study, the authors examine the turnout patterns of identical and non-identical twins—including 396 twins in Los Angeles County and 806 twins in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Their findings suggest that 53% of the variation in turnout can be accounted for by genetic effects in the former, with similar outcomes in the latter. Moreover, genetic-based differences extend to a broad class of acts of political participation, including donating to a campaign, contacting an official, running for office, and attending a rally.

According to researcher James H. Fowler of UC San Diego, “we expected to find that genes played some role in political behavior, but we were quite surprised by the size of the effect and how widely it applies to all kinds of participation.” “The fact that we have found genetic variation in voting, and political participation in general, should not be surprising given the large numbers of behaviors that have already been found to be heritable,” observe the authors.

They conclude by noting that “the next step in this line of research must move beyond estimates…and attempt to identify why genes matter so much.” Some potential avenues include examining the interaction of genes and the environment on political participation, tracing the connections between participation in small groups and large-scale participation, and identifying the genes or groups of genes implicated in political behavior.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Political Science Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. James H. Fowler, Christopher T. Dawes and Laura A. Baker. Genetic Variation in Political Participation. American Political Science Review, Vol. 102, No. 2 May 2008 DOI: 10.1017/S0003055408080209

Cite This Page:

American Political Science Association. "Why Do People Vote? Genetic Variation In Political Participation." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 June 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080626102337.htm>.
American Political Science Association. (2008, June 27). Why Do People Vote? Genetic Variation In Political Participation. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080626102337.htm
American Political Science Association. "Why Do People Vote? Genetic Variation In Political Participation." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080626102337.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

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