Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Various Interrelated Factors Contribute To Conflict In Colombia

Date:
September 4, 2008
Source:
Wiley-Blackwell
Summary:
A new study in Latin American Politics and Society highlights the multifaceted nature of the Colombian conflict, identifying the factors that are driving conflict and illustrating how disregard for the range of these factors lends support to policies that do not enhance prospects for peace.

A new study in Latin American Politics and Society highlights the multifaceted nature of the Colombian conflict, identifying the factors that are driving conflict and illustrating how disregard for the range of these factors lends support to policies that do not enhance prospects for peace.

Related Articles


Vanessa Joan Gray, Ph.D., of the University of Massachusetts-Lowell, identifies six factors driving violent conflict in Colombia: economic forces, state weakness, geography and landscape, U.S. policies, long duration and spin-off violence, and malicious opportunism by noncombatants. While greed motivates much of the violence in Colombia , focusing only on rebels and illegal armies underestimates the role of civilians in promoting violence.

Gray illustrates that to truly understand violence in rural Colombia , one must pay attention to the illegal conduct of legally constituted armed groups, and not just focus on leftist guerillas, criminal mafias, or right-wing paramilitaries. Furthermore, it is a mistake to think that only the illegal drug economy is implicated. For example, many resource sectors, including petroleum, coal, and agribusiness are enmeshed in violence, and the victims are predominantly civilians. Among these victims, moreover, are people who opposed the expansion of resource exploitation in their communities.

Valuable resources are being extracted and cultivated, legally and illicitly, in remote areas where the central government has never been able to defeat its rivals or eradicate banditry. In the hinterlands where most of Colombia ’s resources are found, the government has not established the rule of law, nor has any of the armed groups been able to establish permanent control.

The main causes of organized conflict are state weakness, unique landscape features, and powerful economic forces. High financial stakes and a lawless setting encourage predatory behavior by many different types of groups. Analysts and policymakers that disregard the complex factors fueling violence end up with distorted perceptions of reality that makes policies likely to fail appear sensible.

“Neither the expansion of Colombian security forces, nor the application of martial law, can replace the urgent need for a government that enjoys voluntary compliance and administers justice effectively in all parts of the territory,” Gray concludes.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley-Blackwell. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Vanessa Joan Gray. The New Research on Civil Wars: Does It Help Us Understand the Colombian Conflict? Latin American Politics and Society, 2008; 50 (3): 63-91 [link]

Cite This Page:

Wiley-Blackwell. "Various Interrelated Factors Contribute To Conflict In Colombia." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 September 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080904145213.htm>.
Wiley-Blackwell. (2008, September 4). Various Interrelated Factors Contribute To Conflict In Colombia. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080904145213.htm
Wiley-Blackwell. "Various Interrelated Factors Contribute To Conflict In Colombia." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080904145213.htm (accessed November 23, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Science & Society News

Sunday, November 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

European Parliament Might Call For Google's Break-Up

European Parliament Might Call For Google's Break-Up

Newsy (Nov. 22, 2014) This is the latest development in an antitrust investigation accusing Google of unfairly prioritizing own products and services in search results. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

AFP (Nov. 21, 2014) Having children has always been a frightening prospect in Sierra Leone, the world's most dangerous place to give birth, but Ebola has presented an alarming new threat for expectant mothers. Duration: 00:37 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Toyota's Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Green Car Soon Available in the US

Toyota's Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Green Car Soon Available in the US

AFP (Nov. 21, 2014) Toyota presented its hydrogen fuel-cell compact car called "Mirai" to US consumers at the Los Angeles auto show. The car should go on sale in 2015 for around $60.000. It combines stored hydrogen with oxygen to generate its own power. Duration: 01:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Paralyzed Marine Walks With Robotic Braces

Raw: Paralyzed Marine Walks With Robotic Braces

AP (Nov. 21, 2014) Marine Corps officials say a special operations officer left paralyzed by a sniper's bullet in Afghanistan walked using robotic leg braces in a ceremony to award him a Bronze Star. (Nov. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Science & Society

Business & Industry

Education & Learning

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins