Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Infants Participate In Complex Interactions With Their Parents

Date:
December 4, 2008
Source:
Wiley-Blackwell
Summary:
A new study shows that infants appear to be active participants in complex interactional sequences with their parents far earlier than previously thought.

A new study in the journal Family Process shows that infants appear to be active participants in complex interactional sequences with their parents far earlier than previously thought. Researchers documented the capacity of three-month old infants to share attention with two partners simultaneously.

Triangular capacities were defined as the frequency of babies’ rapid multi-shift gaze transitions between parents, as the infants shifted their gaze back-and-forth between the two adults during a well-established family interaction paradigm. The babies did the same thing in a more stressful procedure in which the two adults challenged them by posing motionless faces following a period of free play.

Early patterns of coordinated infant eye gaze were seen as early as three months, and were linked to signs of better coparental coordination and adjustment within the family.

The infant-family linkages were found by James McHale, Elisabeth Fivaz-Depeursinge, Susan Dickstein, Janet Robertson and Matthew Daley, who evaluated comprehensive assessments of emergent co-parenting alliances completed in the homes of 113 families, and charted infants’ eye gaze patterns during two different mother-father-infant assessments. The investigation was sponsored by the National Institute of Child Health and Development.

“The evidence from our study can embolden practitioners to consider inclusion of babies in therapeutic enactments, drawing attention to their patterns of attention and their role in ongoing family trilogues. Parents' focus can be drawn both to their infant's sensitivity to their ongoing relationship and to the significance of their cooperation as coparents.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley-Blackwell. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. McHale et al. New Evidence for the Social Embeddedness of Infants' Early Triangular Capacities. Family Process, 2008; 47 (4): 445 DOI: 10.1111/j.1545-5300.2008.00265.x

Cite This Page:

Wiley-Blackwell. "Infants Participate In Complex Interactions With Their Parents." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 December 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081203184537.htm>.
Wiley-Blackwell. (2008, December 4). Infants Participate In Complex Interactions With Their Parents. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081203184537.htm
Wiley-Blackwell. "Infants Participate In Complex Interactions With Their Parents." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081203184537.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Monday, July 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A new study shows sleep deprivation can make it harder for people to remember specific details of an event. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
University Quiz Implies Atheists Are Smarter Than Christians

University Quiz Implies Atheists Are Smarter Than Christians

Newsy (July 25, 2014) An online quiz from a required course at Ohio State is making waves for suggesting atheists are inherently smarter than Christians. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

AFP (July 24, 2014) A so-called drugs rehab 'clinic' is closed down in Pakistan after police find scores of ‘patients’ chained up alleging serial abuse. Duration 03:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins