Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

'Short-sleepers' May Develop Blood Sugar Abnormality That Can Lead To Diabetes

Date:
March 17, 2009
Source:
American Heart Association
Summary:
People who slept less than six hours a night during the work week were nearly five times more likely to develop abnormal fasting blood sugar levels over a six-year period. Impaired fasting blood glucose observed in these "short sleepers" is a possible precursor to type 2 diabetes. Researchers do not believe there is a genetic basis for their findings and hope their study leads to more research on sleep duration and its relationship to disease.

People who sleep less than six hours a night appear to have a higher risk of developing impaired fasting glucose — a condition that can precede type 2 diabetes, researchers reported at the American Heart Association’s 49th Annual Conference on Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention.

Related Articles


Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes, appears most often in middle-aged adults. Adolescents and young adults, however, are developing type 2 diabetes at an alarming rate. It develops when the body makes relatively too much insulin and doesn’t efficiently use the insulin it makes (insulin resistance).

Participants who slept on average less than six hours a night during the work week, when followed over six years, were 4.56 times more likely than those getting six to eight hours of sleep to convert from normal blood sugar levels to impaired fasting glucose, researchers said.

“This study supports growing evidence of the association of inadequate sleep with adverse health issues. Sleep should be assessed in the clinical setting as part of well-care visits throughout the life cycle,” said Lisa Rafalson, Ph.D., lead author of the study and National Research Service Award fellow and research assistant professor at the University at Buffalo in New York.

“While previous studies have suggested that there may be many genes that each have a very small effect on the risk of diabetes, there is no known genetic predisposition to sleep disturbances that could explain our study’s results, especially in this limited sample size,” Rafalson said. “It is more likely that pathways involving hormones and the nervous system are involved in the impaired-sleep/fasting glucose association.”

Researchers conducted a matched, nested case-control study to address whether sleep duration at baseline predicted progression from normal to impaired fasting glucose during six years of follow-up in the Western New York Health Study. From 1,455 participants, the team identified 91 whose fasting blood glucose levels of less than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) during baseline exams in 1996–2001 had risen to between 100 mg/dL and 125 mg/dL at follow-up exams in 2003–2004.

The 91 were matched three-to-one with 273 controls whose glucose levels were below 100 mg/dL at baseline and follow-up. Researchers also matched the groups according to gender, race/ethnicity and year of study enrollment.

Sleep duration was self-reported using the Stanford seven-day physical activity recall questionnaire, with patients categorized by their daily work week (Sunday through Thursday) sleep duration: short-sleepers (less than six hours, 25 participants), long-sleepers (more than eight hours, 24 participants) and mid-sleepers (six-to-eight-hour sleepers, 314 participants). Sleep data was unavailable on one person.

After adjusting for age, body mass index, glucose and insulin concentrations, heart rate, high blood pressure, family history of diabetes and symptoms of depression, the researchers found a significantly increased risk of developing impaired fasting glucose among short-sleepers compared to the mid-sleepers. Compared to the mid-sleepers, long-sleepers showed no association with impaired fasting glucose, the researchers report.

“Our findings will hopefully spur additional research into this very complex area of sleep and illness,” Rafalson said.

Co-authors are: Richard P. Donahue, Ph.D., M.P.H.; Michael LaMonte, Ph.D., M.P.H.; Joan Dorn, Ph.D.; Maurizio Trevisan, M.D., M.S.; Saverio Stranges, M.D., Ph.D.; and Jacek Dmochowski, Ph.D. Individual author disclosures are available on the abstract.

The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Heart Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Heart Association. "'Short-sleepers' May Develop Blood Sugar Abnormality That Can Lead To Diabetes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 March 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090311162803.htm>.
American Heart Association. (2009, March 17). 'Short-sleepers' May Develop Blood Sugar Abnormality That Can Lead To Diabetes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090311162803.htm
American Heart Association. "'Short-sleepers' May Develop Blood Sugar Abnormality That Can Lead To Diabetes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090311162803.htm (accessed November 24, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, November 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

AFP (Nov. 23, 2014) The arable district of Kenema in Sierra Leone -- at the centre of the Ebola outbreak in May -- has been under quarantine for three months as the cocoa harvest comes in. Duration: 01:32 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Don't Fall For Flu Shot Myths

Don't Fall For Flu Shot Myths

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) Misconceptions abound when it comes to your annual flu shot. Medical experts say most people older than 6 months should get the shot. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

AFP (Nov. 21, 2014) Having children has always been a frightening prospect in Sierra Leone, the world's most dangerous place to give birth, but Ebola has presented an alarming new threat for expectant mothers. Duration: 00:37 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) Researchers in Beijing discovered a gene called 5-HTA1, and carriers are reportedly 20 percent more likely to be single. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins