Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Kidney Removed Through The Belly Button

Date:
April 27, 2009
Source:
University of Illinois at Chicago
Summary:
Surgeons have used new surgical technique that requires only one small incision to remove a diseased kidney.

A surgeon at the University of Illinois Medical Center at Chicago is one of the first in the Midwest to use a new surgical technique that requires only one small incision to remove a diseased kidney.

Dr. Leslie Deane, assistant professor of urology and director of laparoscopy, endourology and robotic urologic surgery at UIC, inserted a camera and two surgical instruments through a port placed in a one-inch incision in the patient's belly button and remove a diseased kidney the size of an orange.

Surgical techniques have been advancing, as better surgical instruments and the introduction of cameras inside the body have made it possible to operate through small incisions. While laparoscopic approaches generally have fewer complications, shorter hospital stays, and faster recovery times than open surgery, they still usually require three to five incisions, each with attendant risks of bleeding, hernia, and scarring.

The technique called single incision laparoscopic surgery, or SILS, "gives us better pain control following surgery," said Deane. "And, of course, there is a much better cosmetic outcome for many patients. The small scar essentially disappears into their belly button."

Deane's surgical team included his chief resident Dr. Alexis Chesrow and senior resident Dr. Hector Pimentel and the nursing staff Elrayna Aten, RN and Annie Marrs, RN.

Chicago resident Eddie Bibbs, 55, is the mother of four grown children and has a number of grandchildren. She says she is not planning on wearing a bikini anytime soon, but was grateful that the simple incision kept bleeding to a minimum during her April 16 surgery to remove a diseased kidney. "I didn't need any transfusion at all," she said.

Bibbs' kidney had become infected months before, requiring insertion of a tube through the back. The kidney eventually failed, necessitating removal. She has been in and out of the hospital since last November and said she had barely been able to leave her house all winter.

On Friday, the day following the three-and-a-half-hour surgery, Bibbs was up walking the hallways of the hospital and looking forward to going home the next day.

"My daughter said I sound much better and I look much better," Bibbs said.

And, she added, "I feel much, much better!"

Deane expects SILS to become a more common procedure as new instruments are developed that are better adapted to the technique. The trend in surgery today is towards minimizing the size and number of incisions to reduce complications and scarring and improve recovery, he said. And with improvements in robotic technologies, the possibilities will be endless.

"I was also surprised to find that I was able to perform the surgery as quickly and safely through the single port as I would have expected from ordinary laparoscopic surgery," said Deane. "In 2009, the indications for 'open' kidney surgery are few."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Illinois at Chicago. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Illinois at Chicago. "Kidney Removed Through The Belly Button." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090423105350.htm>.
University of Illinois at Chicago. (2009, April 27). Kidney Removed Through The Belly Button. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090423105350.htm
University of Illinois at Chicago. "Kidney Removed Through The Belly Button." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090423105350.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, July 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

AP (July 28, 2014) Classes are being offered nationwide to encourage African Americans to learn about cooking fresh foods based on traditional African cuisine. The program is trying to combat obesity, heart disease and other ailments often linked to diet. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
West Africa Gripped by Deadly Ebola Outbreak

West Africa Gripped by Deadly Ebola Outbreak

AFP (July 28, 2014) The worst-ever outbreak of the deadly Ebola epidemic grips west Africa, killing hundreds. Duration: 00:48 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A national study conducted by the USDA Forest Service found that trees collectively save more than 850 lives on an annual basis. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google's Next Frontier: The Human Body

Google's Next Frontier: The Human Body

Newsy (July 27, 2014) Google is collecting genetic and molecular information to paint a picture of the perfectly healthy human. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins