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Possible Meteorite On Mars Imaged By Opportunity Rover

Date:
August 6, 2009
Source:
NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Summary:
NASA's Opportunity rover has eyed an odd-shaped, dark rock, about 0.6 meters (2 feet) across on the surface of Mars, which may be a meteorite.
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FULL STORY

This image of "Block Island" was taken on July 28, 2009, with the front hazard-identification camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA's Opportunity rover has eyed an odd-shaped, dark rock, about 0.6 meters (2 feet) across on the surface of Mars, which may be a meteorite.

The team spotted the rock called "Block Island," on July 18, 2009, in the opposite direction from which it was driving. The rover then backtracked some 250 meters (820 feet) to study it closer.

Scientists will be testing the rock with the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer to get composition measurements and to confirm if indeed it is a meteorite.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. "Possible Meteorite On Mars Imaged By Opportunity Rover." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 August 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090804094442.htm>.
NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. (2009, August 6). Possible Meteorite On Mars Imaged By Opportunity Rover. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 4, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090804094442.htm
NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. "Possible Meteorite On Mars Imaged By Opportunity Rover." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090804094442.htm (accessed May 4, 2015).

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