Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Outcomes Appear To Be Improving For Conservative Management Of Localized Prostate Cancer

Date:
September 15, 2009
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
A comparison of outcomes of different eras of conservative treatment for localized prostate cancer indicates that overall and prostate cancer-specific survival rates are higher for men diagnosed from 1992 through 2002 compared to men diagnosed in the 1970s and 1980s, according to a new study.

A comparison of outcomes of different eras of conservative treatment for localized prostate cancer indicates that overall and prostate cancer-specific survival rates are higher for men diagnosed from 1992 through 2002 compared to men diagnosed in the 1970s and 1980s, according to a study in the September 16 issue of JAMA.

Related Articles


"Among men, prostate cancer is the most common nonskin cancer and the second most common cause of cancer death in the United States. When diagnosed, prostate cancer is contained within the prostate in approximately 85 percent of cases, and standard treatment options usually include surgery, radiation, or conservative management (active surveillance or deferral of treatment until necessitated by disease signs or symptoms)," according to background information in the article. "Despite its potential as a reasonable treatment choice, however, conservative management has been used in only about 10 percent of patients, perhaps because of a limited understanding of and contemporary data on the anticipated course and outcomes of this approach." The authors add that this lack of reliable contemporary information makes it difficult for patients and their physicians to anticipate outcomes and make informed treatment decisions.

Grace L. Lu-Yao, M.P.H., Ph.D., of the Cancer Institute of New Jersey and UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, N.J., and colleagues analyzed data for men with localized T1 or T2 prostate cancer to evaluate the outcomes of conservatively managed localized prostate cancer diagnosed in the contemporary prostate-specific antigen (PSA) era. The population-based cohort study included 14,516 men age 65 years or older when they were diagnosed (1992-2002) with stage T1 or T2 prostate cancer and whose cases were managed without surgery or radiation for 6 months after diagnosis. Living in areas covered by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program, the men were followed up for a median (midpoint) of 8.3 years (through December 2007). The median age at diagnosis was 78 years.

The researchers found that ten-year prostate cancer–specific mortality was 8.3 percent for men with well-differentiated tumors, 9.1 percent for moderately differentiated, and 25.6 percent for those with poorly differentiated tumors. The corresponding 10-year risks of dying of causes other than prostate cancer were 59.8 percent, 57.2 percent, and 56.5 percent for each respective group.

Ten-year disease-specific mortality for men age 66 to 74 years diagnosed with moderately differentiated disease was 60 percent to 74 percent lower than earlier studies. "Survival results in our contemporary PSA era study cohort were more favorable than results previously reported. For example, in the current study, 10-year prostate cancer–specific mortality was 6 percent in the contemporary PSA era (1992-2002) compared with results of previous studies (15 percent-23 percent) in earlier eras (1949-1992) for men aged 65 to 74 years diagnosed with moderately differentiated disease. Improvement in survival among men with older age or poorly differentiated disease was also observed," the authors write.

"The substantial improvement in survival that we observed in our study compared with previous reports might be explained, in part, by additional lead time, overdiagnosis related to PSA testing, or grade migration, among other factors. Prostate-specific antigen testing identifies disease 6 to 13 years before it presents clinically. Contemporary patients identified through such testing would be expected to live at least 6 to 13 years longer because of this lead time. In addition, previously documented systematic upgrading of modern tumors compared with earlier eras makes more recently graded tumors appear to have a more benign course, resulting in longer survivals. Finally, it is also possible that advancements in medical care might have led to improved outcomes."

"The net overall effect is that outcomes following conservative management are now significantly better than those reported in previous eras; therefore, physicians and their patients may need to reconsider this management option, particularly in light of randomized trial data from the pre-PSA era suggesting little if any benefit to more aggressive intervention."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Grace L. Lu-Yao; Peter C. Albertsen; Dirk F. Moore; Weichung Shih; Yong Lin; Robert S. DiPaola; Michael J. Barry; Anthony Zietman; Michael O'Leary; Elizabeth Walker-Corkery; Siu-Long Yao. Outcomes of Localized Prostate Cancer Following Conservative Management. JAMA, 2009; 302 (11): 1202-1209 [link]

Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Outcomes Appear To Be Improving For Conservative Management Of Localized Prostate Cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 September 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090915174321.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2009, September 15). Outcomes Appear To Be Improving For Conservative Management Of Localized Prostate Cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090915174321.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Outcomes Appear To Be Improving For Conservative Management Of Localized Prostate Cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090915174321.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

Rural India's Low-Cost Sanitary Pad Revolution

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — One man hopes his invention -– a machine that produces cheap sanitary pads –- will help empower Indian women. Duration: 01:51 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

Research on Bats Could Help Develop Drugs Against Ebola

AFP (Nov. 28, 2014) — In Africa's only biosafety level 4 laboratory, scientists have been carrying out experiments on bats to understand how virus like Ebola are being transmitted, and how some of them resist to it. Duration: 01:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) — A recent test of a prototype Ebola vaccine generated an immune response to the disease in subjects. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins