Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Countries Slow To Use Lifesaving Diarrhea Treatments For Children

Date:
October 12, 2009
Source:
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health
Summary:
Despite evidence that low-cost diarrhea treatments such as lower osmolarity oral rehydration salts (ORS) and zinc supplements could drastically reduce the number of deaths among children, little progress has been made in implementing these life-saving techniques.

Despite evidence that low-cost diarrhea treatments such as lower osmolarity oral rehydration salts (ORS) and zinc supplements could drastically reduce the number of deaths among children, little progress has been made in implementing these life-saving techniques, according to researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Related Articles


They examined the implementation of current treatment guidelines and found that few countries are equipped to quickly adapt policies, and many struggle to develop and maintain the recommended supplies. The analysis is featured in the October issue of Bulletin of the World Health Organization.

"Low osmolarity ORS and zinc are inexpensive, safe and easy to use and have the potential to dramatically lower diarrhea morbidity and mortality," said Robert Black, MD, MPH, co-author of the article, chair and Edgar Berman Professor of International Health at the Bloomberg School. "Many countries have changed diarrhea management policies to include low osmolarity ORS and zinc, but there is a significant gap between policy change and effective program implementation, leaving few children treated appropriately. In many countries, adopting child health policies is complex and the registration and importation of zinc supplements requires input from drug regulatory agencies and procurement officials, making it difficult to secure these necessary supplies."

Diarrhea remains the second leading cause of death among children globally, accounting for 18 percent of childhood deaths and 13 percent of all disability-adjusted life years. In 2004 the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF released a joint statement recommending countries switch to a lower osmolarity formulation ORS and introduce zinc supplements for 10 to 14 days to decrease diarrhea deaths among children. The recommendation came after scientific consensus that this treatment has the potential to reduce more than three quarters of all diarrhea associated deaths. Large scale programs in Bangladesh and India have demonstrated that together they can decrease unnecessary use of antibiotics and reinvigorate community management of diarrhea while keeping costs low and saving lives.

"Of 68 priority countries, very few have zinc widely available and coverage within all countries is extremely limited. Ranked by leading global economists as one of the most cost-effective intervention for advancing human development, zinc supplementation in diarrhea management should be a top global health priority," said Christa Fischer Walker, PhD, MHS, lead author of the analysis and an assistant scientist with the Bloomberg School's Department of International Health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. "Countries Slow To Use Lifesaving Diarrhea Treatments For Children." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 October 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091008161858.htm>.
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2009, October 12). Countries Slow To Use Lifesaving Diarrhea Treatments For Children. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091008161858.htm
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. "Countries Slow To Use Lifesaving Diarrhea Treatments For Children." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091008161858.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) — A recent test of a prototype Ebola vaccine generated an immune response to the disease in subjects. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins