Science News
from research organizations

Breast Reduction May Lead To Cancer Detection In Patients

Date:
October 26, 2009
Source:
American Society of Plastic Surgeons
Summary:
There may be some new added benefits to breast reduction surgery. Testing tissue and fat removed during the procedure may lead to increased cancer detection, according to a new study.
Share:
       
FULL STORY

There may be some new added benefits to breast reduction surgery. Testing tissue and fat removed during the procedure may lead to increased cancer detection, reports a new study presented at the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) Plastic Surgery 2009 conference, Oct. 23-27, in Seattle.

Two-hundred-two cases were evaluated. Cancerous or pre-cancerous cells were found in 12.4 percent of patients. Age was significantly associated with negative pathologic findings. The rate of cancer was 6.2 percent in women 40 years or older and 7.9 percent in women 50 years or older. None of the lesions were identified on pre-operative mammograms.

The authors suggest that increased testing in breast reduction patients can help to identify at-risk patients, especially in breast reduction patients over 40.

Nearly 90,000 women had breast reduction surgery in 2008, up 5 percent since 2000, reports the ASPS.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Society of Plastic Surgeons. "Breast Reduction May Lead To Cancer Detection In Patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 October 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091025194501.htm>.
American Society of Plastic Surgeons. (2009, October 26). Breast Reduction May Lead To Cancer Detection In Patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091025194501.htm
American Society of Plastic Surgeons. "Breast Reduction May Lead To Cancer Detection In Patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091025194501.htm (accessed July 1, 2015).

Share This Page: