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Is cannabis the answer to Booze Britain's problems?

Date:
December 4, 2009
Source:
BioMed Central
Summary:
Substituting cannabis in place of more harmful drugs may be a winning strategy in the fight against substance misuse. New research features a poll of 350 cannabis users, finding that 40 percent used cannabis to control their alcohol cravings, 66 percent as a replacement for prescription drugs and 26 percent for other, more potent, illegal drugs.

Substituting cannabis in place of more harmful drugs may be a winning strategy in the fight against substance misuse. Research published in BioMed Central' open access Harm Reduction Journal features a poll of 350 cannabis users, finding that 40% used cannabis to control their alcohol cravings, 66% as a replacement for prescription drugs and 26% for other, more potent, illegal drugs.

Amanda Reiman, from the University of California, Berkeley, USA, carried out the study at Berkeley Patient's Group, a medical cannabis dispensary. She said, "Substituting cannabis for alcohol has been described as a radical alcohol treatment protocol. This approach could be used to address heavy alcohol use in the British Isles -- people might substitute cannabis, a potentially safer drug than alcohol with less negative side-effects, if it were socially acceptable and available."

Reiman found that 65% of people reported using cannabis as a substitute because it has less adverse side effects than alcohol, illicit or prescription drugs, 34% because it has less withdrawal potential and 57.4% because cannabis provides better symptom management. She said, "This brings up two important points. First, self-determination, the right of an individual to decide which treatment or substance is most effective and least harmful for them. Secondly, the recognition that substitution might be a viable alternative to abstinence for those who can't or won't completely stop using psychoactive substances."

Speaking about legalization of cannabis, Reiman added, "The economic hardship of The Great Depression helped bring about the end of alcohol prohibition. Now, as we are again faced with economic struggles, the US is looking to marijuana as a potential revenue generator. Public support is rising for the legalization of recreational use and remains high for the use of marijuana as a medicine. The hope is that this interest will translate into increased research support and the removal of current barriers to conducting such research, such as the Schedule I/Class B status of marijuana."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by BioMed Central. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Amanda Reiman. Cannabis as a Substitute for Alcohol and Other Drugs. Harm Reduction Journal, 2009; (In Press) [link]

Cite This Page:

BioMed Central. "Is cannabis the answer to Booze Britain's problems?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 December 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091130192917.htm>.
BioMed Central. (2009, December 4). Is cannabis the answer to Booze Britain's problems?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091130192917.htm
BioMed Central. "Is cannabis the answer to Booze Britain's problems?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091130192917.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

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