Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Sex in university may be better for mature audiences

Date:
December 18, 2009
Source:
University of Alberta
Summary:
New university students might be thinking about exploring another rite of passage when they get to campus: the joy of sex. However, depending on their level of maturity, some students may find less joy than others.

New university students might be thinking about exploring another rite of passage when they get to campus: the joy of sex. However, depending on their level of maturity, some students may find less joy than others.

New research from University of Alberta psychologists has found that emotionally mature students may get more positive benefits from sex than their less-mature counterparts.

In a study on emotional experiences and sexual behaviours, which included oral and penetrative intercourse, U of A researcher and doctoral student Andrea Dalton and her supervisor Nancy Galambos surveyed first-year students over an eight-month period and found that maturity has an influence on the emotions connected with sexual experience.

"Students who are essentially on the correct developmental timeline with respect to maturity experience sexual behaviour in a positive way," said Dalton. "Immature students, in particular, seem to have negative experiences associated with their sexual behaviour."

Dalton notes that some previous research has viewed sexual activity in young people as inherently negative. Her study points out that for youth who are "on track" emotionally and psychologically, sex may not necessarily be a bad thing. She says that her findings point to the notion that the mature students were, in fact, ready for sex and the psychological and emotional outcomes of that behaviour. The mature students, she notes, benefited positively by engaging in sexual behaviour.

The study showed there was an increase in negative emotion for the immature students who had penetrative sex. But the same result was not present in members of that group who engaged in oral sex, a finding Dalton says may suggest that students might consider oral sex to be a less serious sexual behaviour and, thus, may have less of an overall negative effect on mood.

While it is the dream of many students to move out on their own, the study findings show that move's effect on emotion was not as utopian as one might think. Dalton's study indicated that students who were living outside of their family home environment reported having more negative emotions than those students who lived at home. The transition to university and moving from home into new social surroundings is filled with stressors, says Dalton. However, sexual intimacy could be serving as a coping mechanism for chasing the blues away.

"There seems to be some kind of compensatory effect of sexual behaviour that brings that negative emotion right down," she said. "That was unexpected but interesting, and was another side of what the relation between emotion and sexual relations might mean for students."

Whereas some students may see Dalton's research and determine that sex is the ultimate litmus test for maturity, Dalton cautions engaging in sexual behaviour without weighing one's personal situation, their level of readiness, the potential risks-such as sexually transmitted infections or pregnancy-and motivations for engaging in sexual activity.

"Sexual behaviour can just be one component of this big puzzle that kids are experiencing as part of the transition to university," said Dalton. "It definitely shouldn't be interpreted as a generally negative behaviour.

"It is a goal of healthy human development to include healthy sexuality as well."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Alberta. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Alberta. "Sex in university may be better for mature audiences." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 December 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091218094650.htm>.
University of Alberta. (2009, December 18). Sex in university may be better for mature audiences. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091218094650.htm
University of Alberta. "Sex in university may be better for mature audiences." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091218094650.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

AP (July 22, 2014) Two federal appeals courts issued conflicting rulings Tuesday on the legality of the federally-run healthcare exchange that operates in 36 states. (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The new sci-fi thriller "Lucy" is making people question whether we really use all our brainpower. But, as scientists have insisted for years, we do. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Newsy (July 22, 2014) Boston scientists have discovered a new way to create fully functioning human platelets using a bioreactor and human stem cells. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

TheStreet (July 21, 2014) New research shows Gilead Science's drug Sovaldi helps in curing hepatitis C in those who suffer from HIV. In a medical study, the combination of Gilead's Hep C drug with anti-viral drug Ribavirin cured 76% of HIV-positive patients suffering from the most common hepatitis C strain. Hepatitis C and related complications have been a top cause of death in HIV-positive patients. Typical medication used to treat the disease, including interferon proteins, tended to react badly with HIV drugs. However, Sovaldi's %1,000-a-pill price tag could limit the number of patients able to access the treatment. TheStreet's Keris Lahiff reports from New York. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins