Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Classic grammar model can be used for computerized parsing

Date:
June 1, 2010
Source:
University of Gothenburg
Summary:
A classic Nordic grammar model can be used for computerized grammatical analyses and technical applications of modern Swedish text, new research reveals. One such application enables queries answered by a digital text to be generated when it is opened, and then used to search for specific information in the text.

A classic Nordic grammar model can be used for computerised grammatical analyses and technical applications of modern Swedish text, shows a new thesis in the field of language technology from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. One such application enables queries answered by a digital text to be generated when it is opened, and then used to search for specific information in the text.

Language researcher Kenneth Wilhelmsson has developed a new method which interprets the grammatical structure of a text, known as parsing, with the help of a computer program. The method builds on Danish linguist Paul Diderichsen's traditional sentence structure, which has been adopted for the description of all the Nordic languages and is found in most modern Swedish grammar books.

"The grammatical analysis in the program is performed mostly at the main clause level, which can be seen as a big advantage, as the task is then less complex but still gives usable results," explains Wilhelmsson at the University of Gothenburg.

Instead of performing the entire analysis in one go, the approach consists of a series of steps which can be performed with high levels of accuracy. It is primarily the main clause's finite verb and other single-word sentence elements which are identified at the main clause level. This, in turn, paves the way for the identification of complex sentence elements (subject, object/predicative and adverbial), which can rely on exclusion methodologies and similar rule formulations (heuristics) rather than an explicit, complete grammatical description.

Kenneth Wilhelmsson's newly developed method can also be used by language researchers to search for instances of different grammatical phenomena, which can be described in a more refined fashion than with word and string matching.

Wilhelmsson's work on the thesis also included the creation of various prototype applications which build on this type of analysis. One of them is a unique system for automatic generation of queries from a Swedish text.

The program has access to the Swedish Wikipedia's article database and can be used to generate queries when a text is opened. When the user begins to type a query, the text is completed automatically, and only queries that can actually be answered may be asked.

"This is intended as an alternative to most other modern query programs where the user cannot know whether a query can actually be answered by the knowledge base at all, and where variations in the formulation of the query may mean that information that is there is missed," explains Wilhelmsson.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Gothenburg. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Gothenburg. "Classic grammar model can be used for computerized parsing." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 June 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100531082557.htm>.
University of Gothenburg. (2010, June 1). Classic grammar model can be used for computerized parsing. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100531082557.htm
University of Gothenburg. "Classic grammar model can be used for computerized parsing." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100531082557.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Computers & Math News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Thanks, Marty McFly! Hoverboards Could Be Coming In 2015

Thanks, Marty McFly! Hoverboards Could Be Coming In 2015

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) If you've ever watched "Back to the Future Part II" and wanted to get your hands on a hoverboard, well, you might soon be in luck. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robots to Fly Planes Where Humans Can't

Robots to Fly Planes Where Humans Can't

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 21, 2014) Researchers in South Korea are developing a robotic pilot that could potentially replace humans in the cockpit. Unlike drones and autopilot programs which are configured for specific aircraft, the robots' humanoid design will allow it to fly any type of plane with no additional sensors. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Japanese Scientists Unveil Floating 3D Projection

Japanese Scientists Unveil Floating 3D Projection

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 20, 2014) Scientists in Tokyo have demonstrated what they say is the world's first 3D projection that floats in mid air. A laser that fires a pulse up to a thousand times a second superheats molecules in the air, creating a spark which can be guided to certain points in the air to shape what the human eye perceives as an image. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Apple Enters Mobile Payment Business

Apple Enters Mobile Payment Business

AP (Oct. 20, 2014) Apple is making a strategic bet with the launch of Apple Pay, the mobile pay service aimed at turning your iPhone into your wallet. (Oct. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins