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Women who choose boiled coffee run lower risk of breast cancer, Swedish study finds

Date:
June 16, 2010
Source:
Expertanswer
Summary:
Women who drink Scandinavian boiled coffee, which chemically resembles French press and Turkish/Greek coffee, more than four times a day run a lower risk of developing breast cancer than women who drink coffee less than once a day, according to research from Sweden.

Women who drink Scandinavian boiled coffee, which chemically resembles French press and Turkish/Greek coffee, more than four times a day run a lower risk of developing breast cancer than women who drink coffee less than once a day. This is shown by Lena Nilsson and her associates at Umeå University in an article in the journal Cancer Causes & Control.

A major difference between boiled and filtered coffee is that the boiled version contains up to 80 times as much coffee-specific fatty acids. These fatty acids have previously been shown in animal experiments to inhibit the growth of cancer.

By comparing filtered coffee and boiled coffee in the Västerbotten Intervention Project (64,603 participants), researchers at Umeå University have been able to show for the first time that various brewing techniques can lead to different risk patterns for cancer. For total cancer, prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, and many other less common forms of cancer, there was no correlation.

Among women who drank boiled coffee more than four times a day there was a lowered risk of breast cancer compared with women who drank coffee less than once a day. Among women who drank filtered coffee there was an increased risk for early breast cancer (under 49 years old) and a decreased risk for late breast cancer (over 55 years old). Boiled-coffee drinkers, but not filtered-coffee drinkers, also had an increased risk of pancreatic cancer and lung cancer among men.

The study, recently published in the scientific journal Cancer Causes and Control, is the first in the world to compare the consumption of coffee prepared with two brewing techniques in regard to cancer.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Expertanswer. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Lena Maria Nilsson, Ingegerd Johansson, Per Lenner, Bernt Lindahl, Bethany Guelpen. Consumption of filtered and boiled coffee and the risk of incident cancer: a prospective cohort study. Cancer Causes & Control, 2010; DOI: 10.1007/s10552-010-9582-x

Cite This Page:

Expertanswer. "Women who choose boiled coffee run lower risk of breast cancer, Swedish study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 June 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100615151255.htm>.
Expertanswer. (2010, June 16). Women who choose boiled coffee run lower risk of breast cancer, Swedish study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 14, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100615151255.htm
Expertanswer. "Women who choose boiled coffee run lower risk of breast cancer, Swedish study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100615151255.htm (accessed September 14, 2014).

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