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If we build 'walkable' neighborhoods, will people walk?

Date:
June 25, 2010
Source:
University of Alberta - Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation
Summary:
Stakeholders in neighborhood development in Edmonton, Alberta, said societal norms, such as a pervasive car-dependent culture, the desire by consumers for single family homes, and financial constraints all played key roles in neighborhood development -- and whether people would walk if the neighborhood were built that way.

Edmontonians (people who live in the city of Edmonton, Canada) love their cars. In fact, 77 percent of them make all their trips by car. So if they know that it's healthier to walk, will developing more walkable neighbourhoods help to break the habit and get them walking to the store instead?

Researcher Marianne Clark in the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation set out to investigate the factors that influence the decisions made by key stakeholders involved in neighbourhood development. She interviewed 17 stakeholders in neighbourhood development, including public health and municipal employees, city councilors, and private sector stakeholders including land developers and food retailers.

"We asked about their definition of a healthy neighbourhood. What they thought their role was; what facilitated their efforts to build healthy neighbourhoods and what barriers they experienced," says Clark. "We also wanted to know about 'food security' -- in essence the importance of the proximity of grocery stores with affordable healthy food choices."

"There were varying views among stakeholders as to whether walkable neighbourhoods are really going to make that much of a difference in making people active," says Clark. "While municipal employees and public health officials believed deeply in the value of these neighbourhoods, developers generally thought the extent of their responsibility was limited to market and consumer demands. They were also sceptical of the notion of 'if you built it, they will walk.' According to developers, it's up to the individual whether they choose to walk or not, regardless of the design of the neighbourhood, but they also acknowledged that our social norms and customs are very entrenched in car culture."

Private sector stakeholders said that people generally see success as having a single-family home. "To create affordable housing," notes Clark, "you have to build in the suburbs. There's a social hierarchy thing going on that may not change or disappear just because neighbourhoods are built more walkable or dense. There's also the car culture and the consumer culture (to contend with.")

"Car dependency/reliance" -- the need to be able to drive everywhere easily from home, was mentioned by all stakeholders interviewed, as pervasive in Edmonton, notes Clark. Land developers also noted Edmonton's cold climate and plenty of space to keep pushing the boundaries of Edmonton, also lent to the pervasive car culture.

Budget was another commonly-cited constraint.

In a surprise finding, Clark says, "People's access to good, healthy food, such as at affordable grocery stores was not generally perceived as a problem. Edmonton has a very diverse range of socio-economic status (SES) neighbourhoods and populations. (This fact) was overlooked by most stakeholders, but city councilors were more aware and spoke to it most directly."

What all stakeholders agreed on was that to build neighbourhoods so they were conducive to healthy, active lifestyles involved collaboration from all stakeholders when neighbourhood developments were in the planning stages.

Notes Clark," There are lingering tensions about what the end results of these neighbourhoods might actually be; where the responsibilities lie in terms of public and private sectors. That question is more complicated than what we've thought it was before.

"When we look at this issue, though, we need to look at the broader societal issues. We may be naοve to think that if we build these great neighbourhoods that everything's going to change and everyone's going to starting walking more and be more healthy," says Clark.

Clark's study was published in Health & Place and is part of a larger research project headed by Tanya Berry on the impact of the built environment on BMI (body mass index.)


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Alberta - Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Alberta - Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation. "If we build 'walkable' neighborhoods, will people walk?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 June 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100625185714.htm>.
University of Alberta - Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation. (2010, June 25). If we build 'walkable' neighborhoods, will people walk?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100625185714.htm
University of Alberta - Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation. "If we build 'walkable' neighborhoods, will people walk?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100625185714.htm (accessed April 19, 2014).

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