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Simple massage relieves chronic tension headache, study finds

Date:
July 11, 2010
Source:
University of Granada
Summary:
Researchers in Spain have shown that the psychological and physiological state of patients with tension headache improves within 24 hours after receiving a 30-minute massage.

Researchers at the University of Granada -- in collaboration with the Clinical Hospital San Cecilio and the University Rey Juan Carlos -- have shown that the psychological and physiological state of patients with tension headache improves within 24 hours after receiving a 30-minute massage.

As researchers explained, tension headaches have an increasing incidence in the population. This type of disorder is usually treated with analgesics, that relieve symptoms temporarily. One of the main causes of this type of headache is the presence of trigger points. Recently, new strategies for controlling this disabling pain are being studied.

Physiological improvement

Researcher Cristina Toro Velasco -- leader of the study, under Professor Manuel Arroyo Morales supervision -- has shown that a 30-minute massage on cervical trigger points improves autonomic nervous system regulation in these patients. Additionally, patients exhibit a better psychological state and "reduce the stress and anxiety associated to such a disturbing disorder."

Similarly, patients report a perceived relief from symptoms within 24 hours after the massage. This might mean that massages may reduce the pain caused by trigger points, which would involve an improvement in the general state of patients.

The results of this pioneer study were published in American Journal of Manipulative Physiological and Therapeutics.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Granada. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Cristina Toro-Velasco, Manuel Arroyo-Morales, César Fernández-de-las-Peñas, Joshua A. Cleland, Francisco J. Barrero-Hernández. Short-Term Effects of Manual Therapy on Heart Rate Variability, Mood State, and Pressure Pain Sensitivity in Patients With Chronic Tension-Type Headache: A Pilot Study. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 2009; 32 (7): 527 DOI: 10.1016/j.jmpt.2009.08.011

Cite This Page:

University of Granada. "Simple massage relieves chronic tension headache, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 July 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100708081233.htm>.
University of Granada. (2010, July 11). Simple massage relieves chronic tension headache, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100708081233.htm
University of Granada. "Simple massage relieves chronic tension headache, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100708081233.htm (accessed September 19, 2014).

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