Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Data storage: World record data density for ferroelectric recording

Date:
August 17, 2010
Source:
American Institute of Physics
Summary:
Scientists in Japan have recorded data at a density of 4 trillion bits per square inch, a world record for the experimental "ferroelectric" data storage method. This density is about eight times the density of today's most advanced magnetic hard-disk drives.

Scientists at Tohoku University in Japan have recorded data at a density of 4 trillion bits per square inch, which is a world record for the experimental "ferroelectric" data storage method. As described the journal Applied Physics Letters, which is published by the American Institute of Physics, this density is about eight times the density of today's most advanced magnetic hard-disk drives.

Related Articles


The data-recording device scans a tiny cantilever tip that rides in contact with the surface of a ferroelectric material. To write data, an electric pulse is sent through the tip, changing the electric polarization and nonlinear dielectric constant of a tiny circular spot in the substrate beneath. To read data, the same tip detects the variations in nonlinear dielectric constant in the altered regions.

"We expect this ferroelectric data storage system to be a candidate to succeed magnetic hard disk drives or flash memory, at least in applications for which extremely high data density and small physical volume is required," said Dr. Yasuo Cho.

In earlier experiments, the researchers had noticed one problem: When the data being written required that several consecutive marks be written next to each other, the written polarized regions expanded the normal diameter and coalesced to the point the bits were not distinct. Cho and Kenkou Tanaka then developed a method for anticipating strings of consecutive marks in the data and reducing the writing-pulse voltage by up to about 10 percent, which resulted in clear and distinct data marks.

While ferroelectric storage has the advantage of using only electric methods -- nothing magnetic or thermal -- to achieve its record-high density, Cho and Tanaka are well aware that many practical improvements would be needed for commercial viability. Such advances would include increasing the speed and accuracy of reading the data and developing a low-cost ferroelectric substrate.

Another risk is that existing data storage technologies continue to improve beyond the ferroelectric's capabilities. Disk drive maker Seagate, for example, has said it can envision achieving a density of 50 trillion bits per square inch.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Institute of Physics. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kenkou Tanaka and Yasuo Cho. Actual Information Storage with a Recording Density of 4 Tbit/inch^2 in a ferroelectric recording medium. Applied Physics Letters, (in press)

Cite This Page:

American Institute of Physics. "Data storage: World record data density for ferroelectric recording." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 August 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100817090753.htm>.
American Institute of Physics. (2010, August 17). Data storage: World record data density for ferroelectric recording. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100817090753.htm
American Institute of Physics. "Data storage: World record data density for ferroelectric recording." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/08/100817090753.htm (accessed October 30, 2014).

Share This



More Computers & Math News

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Arm Restores Amputee Dexterity

Mind-Controlled Prosthetic Arm Restores Amputee Dexterity

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 29, 2014) A Swedish amputee who became the first person to ever receive a brain controlled prosthetic arm is able to manipulate and handle delicate objects with an unprecedented level of dexterity. The device is connected directly to his bone, nerves and muscles, giving him the ability to control it with his thoughts. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robots Get Funky on the Dance Floor

Robots Get Funky on the Dance Floor

AP (Oct. 29, 2014) Dancing, spinning and fighting robots are showing off their agility at "Robocomp" in Krakow. (Oct. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
IBM Taps Into Twitter's Data With New Partnership

IBM Taps Into Twitter's Data With New Partnership

Newsy (Oct. 29, 2014) The new partnership will allow IBM to access Twitter’s data and analytics to help IBM clients better understand their consumers. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google To Use Nanoparticles, Wearables To Detect Disease

Google To Use Nanoparticles, Wearables To Detect Disease

Newsy (Oct. 29, 2014) Google X wants to improve modern medicine with nanoparticles and a wearable device. It's all an attempt to tackle disease detection and prevention. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins