Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New tool to measure quality of patient care

Date:
November 29, 2010
Source:
University of California - Los Angeles
Summary:
A national conversation continues about the best ways to improve both the quality of medical care and to contain costs. So far, developing quality measurements has focused on primary care or highly prevalent, chronic conditions such as asthma and diabetes. But what about brain disorders?

A national conversation continues about the best ways to improve both the quality of medical care and to contain costs. So far, developing quality measurements has focused on primary care or highly prevalent, chronic conditions such as asthma and diabetes. But what about brain disorders? To date, the number of measures that apply to neurologic care has been limited.

The American Academy of Neurology (AAN), an association of more than 22,500 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, reached out to a group of neurologists to develop such a set of measurements. Led by Dr. Eric M. Cheng, a UCLA assistant professor of neurology, the group developed a new tool to help doctors gauge how well they are caring for people with Parkinson's disease, a neurological disorder that is estimated to effect nearly 1 million people in the United States. The results are published in Neurology, the medical journal of the AAN.

"Measuring the quality of health care is a fundamental step toward improving it," said Cheng, lead author of the study and a clinician with the Veterans Administration Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System. "Quality measures have been developed for conditions seen by primary care doctors for years, but not for many specialty care conditions such as brain disorders."

The AAN has developed measures for stroke and epilepsy and is working on developing similar measures for dementia, neuropathy and multiple sclerosis. The measures for Parkinson's are intended to help doctors determine how well they care for their patients. The group developed 10 separate measures to evaluate care for Parkinson's patients, including non-motor (movement) symptoms, such as depression or sleep, which are strongly associated with quality of life. Another measures the patient's current diagnosis or treatment, while another measures safety, including counseling on preventable complications, such as falls.

"Quality measures like these will be increasingly important for extending the best care possible to people with neurologic disorders like Parkinson's," said Cheng. "But none of these measures prescribe the use of specific medications, assessment tools or treatment options. It was important to leave clinicians with flexibility in how the measures can be successfully completed."

The study was funded by the AAN. Besides Cheng, five other authors were involved with the study. Cheng is supported by the VA Parkinson's Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center. He is also involved with the National Parkinson Foundation and receives research support from the National Institutes of Health, Department of Veterans Affairs, National Multiple Sclerosis Society and the American Heart Association.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of California - Los Angeles. The original article was written by Mark Wheeler. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of California - Los Angeles. "New tool to measure quality of patient care." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 November 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101129160946.htm>.
University of California - Los Angeles. (2010, November 29). New tool to measure quality of patient care. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101129160946.htm
University of California - Los Angeles. "New tool to measure quality of patient care." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101129160946.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) A new study says children born less than one year and more than five years after a sibling can have an increased risk for autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robotic Hair Restoration

Robotic Hair Restoration

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A new robotic procedure is changing the way we transplant hair. The ARTAS robot leaves no linear scarring and provides more natural results. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A heart monitor the size of a paperclip that can save your life. The “Reveal Linq” allows a doctor to monitor patients with A-Fib on a continuous basis for up to 3 years! Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Attacking Superbugs

Attacking Superbugs

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) Two weapons hospitals can use to attack superbugs. Scientists in Ireland created a new gel resistant to superbugs, and a robot that can disinfect a room in minutes. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins