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Boxing is risky business for the brain

Date:
December 10, 2010
Source:
Deutsches Aerzteblatt International
Summary:
Up to 20% of professional boxers develop neuropsychiatric sequelae. But which acute complications and which late sequelae can boxers expect throughout the course of their career?

Up to 20% of professional boxers develop neuropsychiatric sequelae. But which acute complications and which late sequelae can boxers expect throughout the course of their career? These are the questions studied by Hans Förstl from the Technical University Munich and his co-authors in the current issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International.

Their evaluation of the biggest studies on the subject of boxers' health in the past 10 years yielded the following results: The most relevant acute consequence is the knock-out, which conforms to the rules of the sport and which, in neuropsychiatric terms, corresponds to cerebral concussion.

In addition, boxers are at substantial risk for acute injuries to the head, heart, and skeleton. Subacute consequences after being knocked out include persistent symptoms such as headaches, impaired hearing, nausea, unstable gait, and forgetfulness. The cognitive deficits after blunt craniocerebral trauma last measurably longer than the symptoms persist in the individual's subjective perception. Some 10-20% of boxers develop persistent neuropsychiatric impairments. The repeated cerebral trauma in a long career in boxing may result in boxer's dementia (dementia pugilistica), which is neurobiologically similar to Alzheimer's disease.

With regard to the health risks, a clear difference exists between professional boxing and amateur boxing. Amateur boxers are examined regularly every year and in advance of boxing matches, whereas professionals subject themselves to their fights without such protective measures. In view of the risk for injuries that may result in impaired cerebral performance in the short or long term, similar measures would be advisable in the professional setting too.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Deutsches Aerzteblatt International. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Förstl H, Haass C, Hemmer B, Meyer B, Halle M:. Boxing: acute complications and late sequelae, from concussion to dementia. Deutsches Ärzteblatt International, 2010; 107[47]: 835-9 DOI: 10.3238/arztebl.2010.0835

Cite This Page:

Deutsches Aerzteblatt International. "Boxing is risky business for the brain." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 December 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101210075924.htm>.
Deutsches Aerzteblatt International. (2010, December 10). Boxing is risky business for the brain. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101210075924.htm
Deutsches Aerzteblatt International. "Boxing is risky business for the brain." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101210075924.htm (accessed October 22, 2014).

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