Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Soldiers’ brains adapt to perceived threat during mission

Date:
January 26, 2011
Source:
Radboud University Nijmegen
Summary:
A study of soldiers who took part in the ISAF mission in Afghanistan between 2008 and 2010 has found that their brains adapt when they are continuously exposed to stress. The perceived threat appears to be the major predictor of brain adaptation, rather than the actual events. In other words, if a roadside bomb goes off right in front of you, the degree to which you perceive this as threatening is what counts. This is what determines how the brain and the stress system adapt. Between 2008 and 2010 the researchers studied a group of 36 soldiers. Before and after taking part in the mission, the soldiers’ brain activity was measured and compared with the brain activity of a control group of equal size who stayed at home. Unique to this study is that it is the first to use a control group. This control group, which stayed behind in the barracks in the Netherlands, had received similar combat training.

A study of soldiers who took part in the ISAF mission in Afghanistan between 2008 and 2010 has found that their brains adapt when they are continuously exposed to stress. The perceived threat appears to be the major predictor of brain adaptation, rather than the actual events. In other words, if a roadside bomb goes off right in front of you, the degree to which you perceive this as threatening is what counts. This is what determines how the brain and the stress system adapt.

These results will be published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry on January 18.

Between 2008 and 2010 the researchers studied a group of 36 soldiers. Before and after taking part in the mission, the soldiers' brain activity was measured and compared with the brain activity of a control group of equal size who stayed at home. Unique to this study is that it is the first to use a control group. This control group, which stayed behind in the barracks in the Netherlands, had received similar combat training.

First study with control group

'Thanks to the design of our study, for the first time we can now conclude that the effects on the brain really are due to experiences in combat. The soldiers taking part in the ISAF mission in Afghanistan had their brains scanned twice. They also filled out questionnaires about their experiences during combat. The soldiers did not develop posttraumatic stress disorders (PTSD) but their experiences did have an effect on the neural circuits in the brain that regulate vigilance and that are also involved in controlling emotion. This effect persisted for at least two months after the soldiers returned home,' says Guido van Wingen of the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour at Radboud University Nijmegen, first author of the study.

Military mental health study

This research is part of a long-term project in collaboration with the Military Mental Health Research Centre and the Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience in Utrecht. Activity in the amygdala and insula, the fear and vigilance centres in the brain, increases in all soldiers on mission. But the changes in the emotional control centre in the frontal lobe depend strongly on how they perceived threatening events during the mission. The researchers are now working on a follow-up study to see how long the changes in soldiers' heads remain, and whether or not those that perceived high levels of stress are also at higher risk of developing symptoms of posttraumatic stress.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Radboud University Nijmegen. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. G A van Wingen, E Geuze, E Vermetten, G Fernαndez. Perceived threat predicts the neural sequelae of combat stress. Molecular Psychiatry, 2011; DOI: 10.1038/mp.2010.132

Cite This Page:

Radboud University Nijmegen. "Soldiers’ brains adapt to perceived threat during mission." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 January 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110119095456.htm>.
Radboud University Nijmegen. (2011, January 26). Soldiers’ brains adapt to perceived threat during mission. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110119095456.htm
Radboud University Nijmegen. "Soldiers’ brains adapt to perceived threat during mission." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110119095456.htm (accessed April 17, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Study On Artists' Brain Shows They're 'Structurally Unique'

Study On Artists' Brain Shows They're 'Structurally Unique'

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) — The brains of artists aren't really left-brain or right-brain, but rather have extra neural matter in visual and motor control areas. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Is Apathy A Sign Of A Shrinking Brain?

Is Apathy A Sign Of A Shrinking Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) — A recent study links apathetic feelings to a smaller brain. Researchers say the results indicate a need for apathy screening for at-risk seniors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Are School Dress Codes Too Strict?

Are School Dress Codes Too Strict?

AP (Apr. 16, 2014) — Pushing the limits on style and self-expression is a rite of passage for teens and even younger kids. How far should schools go with their dress codes? The courts have sided with schools in an era when school safety is paramount. (April 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) — A new study conducted by researchers at Northwestern and Harvard suggests even casual marijuana use can alter your brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins