Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Relatively few young adults with autism spectrum disorders receive assistance after high school

Date:
February 7, 2011
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
Use of medical, mental health and case management services for young adults with an autism spectrum disorder appears to decline after high school, according to a new study.

Use of medical, mental health and case management services for young adults with an autism spectrum disorder appears to decline after high school, according to a report in the February issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Related Articles


"The number of young adults in the United States diagnosed as having an autism spectrum disorder is increasing rapidly as ever-larger cohorts of children identified as having an autism spectrum disorder age through adolescence," according to background information in the article. "Regardless of the root cause, the facts remain that treated prevalence is increasing and that the implications of this trend for service systems are poorly understood."

Paul T. Shattuck, Ph.D., of Washington University, St. Louis, and colleagues analyzed data from a nationally representative telephone questionnaire surveying parents and guardians of young adults between the ages of 19 and 23 years with an autism spectrum disorder. Surveys were conducted from April 2007 to February 2008.

Overall rates of service use ranged from 9.1 percent for speech therapy to 41.9 percent for case management. Other services utilized included medical services (23.5 percent) and mental health services (35 percent). About two-fifths of youths (39.1 percent) had not received any of these services. These rates are lower than estimates gathered six years earlier when all patients were still in high school. During that time, 46.2 percent received mental health services, 46.9 percent received medical services, 74.6 percent were getting speech therapy and 63.6 percent had a case manager.

The adjusted odds of not receiving any of the services was 3.31 times higher for African American youths compared to white youths, and was 5.96 times higher for those with incomes of $25,000 or less compared with those making $75,000 or more. Additionally, the adjusted odds of not using case management services were 5.88 times higher among those making $25,000 or less compared with those with incomes of $75,000 or greater.

"Rates of service disengagement are high after exiting high school. Disparities by race and socioeconomic status indicate a need for targeted outreach and services," the authors conclude. "This study represents an important step in the process of building a foundation of evidence that can help improve services and foster independence and health among youths with autism spectrum disorders."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. P. T. Shattuck, M. Wagner, S. Narendorf, P. Sterzing, M. Hensley. Post-High School Service Use Among Young Adults With an Autism Spectrum Disorder. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 2011; 165 (2): 141 DOI: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.279

Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Relatively few young adults with autism spectrum disorders receive assistance after high school." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 February 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110207165506.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2011, February 7). Relatively few young adults with autism spectrum disorders receive assistance after high school. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110207165506.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Relatively few young adults with autism spectrum disorders receive assistance after high school." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110207165506.htm (accessed December 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Double-Amputee Becomes First To Move Two Prosthetic Arms With His Mind

Double-Amputee Becomes First To Move Two Prosthetic Arms With His Mind

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) A double-amputee makes history by becoming the first person to wear and operate two prosthetic arms using only his mind. Jen Markham has the story. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Prenatal Exposure To Pollution Might Increase Autism Risk

Prenatal Exposure To Pollution Might Increase Autism Risk

Newsy (Dec. 18, 2014) Harvard researchers found children whose mothers were exposed to high pollution levels in the third trimester were twice as likely to develop autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Yoga Could Be As Beneficial For The Heart As Walking, Biking

Yoga Could Be As Beneficial For The Heart As Walking, Biking

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) Yoga can help your weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and heart just as much as biking and walking does, a new study suggests. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins