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When fingers start tapping, the music must be striking a chord

Date:
February 22, 2011
Source:
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council
Summary:
According to a psychologist, understanding how people follow a musical beat could be revealing how children master one of the most complex tasks of all -- speech. Earlier research showed that adults who stutter have problems in acquiring new and unusual tapping sequences and not just speech. The research suggests an underlying neural basis for the motor deficit.
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According to University of Toronto speech-language pathologist Luc De Nil, the beat could be revealing such things as how children master one of the most complex tasks of all -- speech.

"The rapid and precise muscle movements of speech must be the most intricate, yet poorly understood, of all the sensory-motor skills," says De Nil.

De Nil's interest in finger-tapping came out of his group's previous work on adults who stutter. His team discovered that they have problems in acquiring new and unusual tapping sequences and not just speech. The research suggests an underlying neural basis for the motor deficit.

The researchers tested the abilities of stuttering adults to learn both speech and tapping sequences. In some experiments, the participants were given extensive practice lasting more than one day. Other studies investigated the effects on the accuracy of a speaker's performance when motor learning was disrupted. To follow up, the investigators use magnetic resonance imaging and fMRI to observe and analyze the neural processes underlying speech production in children and adults who stutter.

"We turned to children next because we wanted to know if the adult data was relevant to them and if giving them finger and speech tasks would let us observe motor skills as they develop in both stutterers and non-stutterers."

De Nil discussed some of the findings at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting held in Washington, D.C. He took part in the session From Freud to fMRI: Untangling the Mystery of Stuttering on February 20.


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


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Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council. "When fingers start tapping, the music must be striking a chord." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 February 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110219160005.htm>.
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council. (2011, February 22). When fingers start tapping, the music must be striking a chord. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 5, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110219160005.htm
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council. "When fingers start tapping, the music must be striking a chord." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110219160005.htm (accessed July 5, 2015).

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