Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Share of black science and engineering degrees from historically black colleges and universities declines in 2008

Date:
February 28, 2011
Source:
National Science Foundation
Summary:
More than 45 years after the Civil Rights Act of 1964, National Science Foundation statistics show minority academic institutions still enroll a substantial number of minority students, but the percentage of minorities earning bachelor's degrees in science and engineering from minority-serving institutions has declined over time.

More than 45 years after the Civil Rights Act of 1964, National Science Foundation (NSF) statistics show minority academic institutions still enroll a substantial number of minority students, but the percentage of minorities earning bachelor's degrees in science and engineering (S&E) from minority-serving institutions has declined over time.

Statistics published February 28in a report titled "Women, Minorities, and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering: 2011" show that 26 percent of blacks earned S&E bachelor's degrees from historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in 2000, while only 20 percent earned them from HBCUs in 2008.

Published by NSF's National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics (NCSES), formerly the Division of Science Resources Statistics, the report charts the participation of women, minorities, and persons with disabilities in science and engineering education and employment.

According to the report's findings, underrepresented minorities--blacks, Hispanics, and American Indians--are less likely than whites to attend college or to graduate. About 53 percent of blacks and 35 percent of Hispanics versus 68 percent of whites attend college, while 19 percent of blacks and 12 percent of Hispanics versus 37 percent of whites graduate.

But for those underrepresented minorities who do graduate, the degree patterns are similar to those of whites. In fact, the shares of S&E bachelor's and master's degrees for underrepresented minorities have been rising for two decades since 1989.

For example, underrepresented minorities received 10 percent of S&E bachelor's degrees in 1989 compared to 17 percent in 2008.

Underrepresented minorities' participation in social-behavioral, computer and medical-other life sciences has increased faster than in other S&E fields.

The participation of blacks is substantially lower in S&E occupations, as well as in all professional and related science occupations than it is in the U.S. workforce as a whole. Blacks, who are about 12 percent of the U.S. population, make up only about 3 percent of all U.S. scientists and engineers. Moreover, they are a smaller percentage of engineers than they are of scientists.

Meanwhile, the share of full-time full S&E professorships held by underrepresented minorities has risen more slowly than the share held by women and has remained fairly flat in recent years.

Underrepresented minority women, who hold faculty positions, are less likely to have received federal grants or contracts than underrepresented minority men and women of other racial and ethnic groups.

This report is available online through the NCSES homepage of the National Science Foundation's website.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Science Foundation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Science Foundation. "Share of black science and engineering degrees from historically black colleges and universities declines in 2008." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 February 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110228151754.htm>.
National Science Foundation. (2011, February 28). Share of black science and engineering degrees from historically black colleges and universities declines in 2008. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110228151754.htm
National Science Foundation. "Share of black science and engineering degrees from historically black colleges and universities declines in 2008." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110228151754.htm (accessed October 22, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) A medical team has for the first time given a man the ability to walk again after transplanting cells from his brain onto his severed spinal cord. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Portable Breathalyzer Gets You Home Safely

Portable Breathalyzer Gets You Home Safely

Buzz60 (Oct. 21, 2014) Breeze, a portable breathalyzer, gets you home safely by instantly showing your blood alcohol content, and with one tap, lets you call an Uber, a cab or a friend from your contact list to pick you up. Sean Dowling (@SeanDowlingTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Your Birth Season Might Determine Your Temperament

Your Birth Season Might Determine Your Temperament

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) A new study says the season you're born in can determine your temperament — and one season has a surprising outcome. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Movies Might Desensitize Violence For Parents, Not Just Kids

Movies Might Desensitize Violence For Parents, Not Just Kids

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) A study suggests that parents become desensitized to violent movies as well as children, which leads them to allow their kids to view violent films. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins