Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Three in four domestic violence victims go unidentified in emergency rooms, new study shows

Date:
March 17, 2011
Source:
Springer Science+Business Media
Summary:
Although nearly 80 percent of female victims of intimate partner violence visit emergency departments for medical complaints, as many as 72 percent are not identified as victims of abuse. Of those who are, very few are offered adequate support, according to new research.

Although nearly 80 percent of female victims of intimate partner violence visit emergency departments for medical complaints, as many as 72 percent are not identified as victims of abuse. Of those who are, very few are offered adequate support, according to Dr. Karin Rhodes, from the University of Pennsylvania in the US, and her colleagues.

Their work appears online this week in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, published by Springer.

Emergency departments have mandated protocols for intimate partner violence screening and intervention. Rhodes and team assessed how effective the emergency department providers were at identifying cases of domestic abuse, which characteristics of the victim made her more likely to be identified as a victim, and what support was provided when partner violence was identified.

The researchers examined all emergency department visits and intimate partner violence-related police events over a four-year period (1999-2002). The study took place within eight emergency departments, twelve police jurisdictions, and the prosecuting attorney's office, in a semi-rural Midwestern county in the US.

A total of 993 female victims of domestic violence generated 3,246 related police incidents over the four-year period. Approximately 80 percent went to emergency departments after the date of the documented incident. Nearly 80 percent of them came with medical complaints and 72 percent were never identified as victims of abuse, even though, on average, these women visited the emergency department seven times over the study period. Women who had filed a police complaint that day, or been taken to the hospital by the police, those who self-disclosed domestic assault, and those who had mental health and substance abuse issues, were more likely to be identified as victims of intimate partner violence.

When victims were identified, the emergency department response included legally useful documentation 86 percent of the time, police contact 50 percent of the time and a social worker 45 percent of the time. Unfortunately, only 33 percent of the time did providers assess whether the victim had a safe place to go and only 25 percent of identified victims were referred to domestic violence services.

The authors conclude: "Our work shows that the majority of police-identified intimate partner violence victims frequently use the emergency department for health care, but they are unlikely to be identified or receive any intervention in that setting. Current screening practices for intimate partner violence victims are ineffective and policy-driven interventions for identified victims are, at best, erratically implemented."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Springer Science+Business Media. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Karin V. Rhodes, Catherine L. Kothari, Melissa Dichter, Catherine Cerulli, James Wiley, Steve Marcus. Intimate Partner Violence Identification and Response: Time for a Change in Strategy. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 2011; DOI: 10.1007/s11606-011-1662-4

Cite This Page:

Springer Science+Business Media. "Three in four domestic violence victims go unidentified in emergency rooms, new study shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 March 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110316092708.htm>.
Springer Science+Business Media. (2011, March 17). Three in four domestic violence victims go unidentified in emergency rooms, new study shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110316092708.htm
Springer Science+Business Media. "Three in four domestic violence victims go unidentified in emergency rooms, new study shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110316092708.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, September 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 30, 2014) California lawmakers pass a bill requiring universities to adopt "affirmative consent" language in their definitions of consensual sex, part of a nationwide drive to curb sexual assault on campuses. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Drug Could Reduce Cardiovascular Deaths

New Drug Could Reduce Cardiovascular Deaths

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) The new drug from Novartis could reduce cardiovascular deaths by 20 percent compared to other similar drugs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins