Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

How do creative ads shake up the way we think?

Date:
May 31, 2011
Source:
University of Chicago Press Journals
Summary:
Innovative ads can help creative consumers break away from their existing thought patterns, according to a new study. These creative stimuli can affect the way consumers process information about different products.

Innovative ads can help creative consumers break away from their existing thought patterns, according to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research. These creative stimuli can affect the way consumers process information about different products.

"Creative marketing stimuli are pervasive in the marketplace as marketers and advertisers scramble to break through the clutter to attract consumers' attention and win their approval," write authors Xiaojing Yang (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), Torsten Ringberg (Copenhagen Business School), Huifang Mao (University of Central Florida), and Laura A. Peracchio (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee).

The authors found that exposure to creative messages, designs, or brand logos induced consumers to think more creatively, which in turn affected the way they processed unrelated ads. They looked at the way consumers with a creative mindset are persuaded by advertising claims that operate at different levels -- abstract vs. concrete. For example, abstract ads for a tablet computer could focus on its convenience and elegance, whereas concrete ads could elaborate on features such as the touch capability or the GPS. Generally, people who tend to think at an abstract level respond better to abstract claims, and vice versa.

In their experiments, the authors found that creative stimuli reversed the usual pattern of persuasion. "Respondents who viewed three creative ads first were more persuaded by ad claims portrayed in a way that was incompatible with their own thinking," the authors write. In other words, abstract thinkers found concrete ad claims more appealing, and vice versa.

"The findings of this research accentuate the need to reconsider some of our existing marketing practices," the authors write. "Though it still makes sense to target consumers segments with ad campaigns that tap into their way of thinking, marketers should be aware that this practice is most effective for consumers with a less creative mindset. To target those consumers with a creative mindset, marketers might actually augment their advertising effectiveness if their ad messages involve some kind of creative departure from the segment's common way of thinking."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Chicago Press Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Xiaojing Yang, Torsten Ringberg, Huifang Mao, and Laura A. Peracchio. The Construal (In)compatibility Effect: The Moderating Role of a Creative Mindset. Journal of Consumer Research, December 2011 DOI: 10.1086/660118

Cite This Page:

University of Chicago Press Journals. "How do creative ads shake up the way we think?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 May 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110509114025.htm>.
University of Chicago Press Journals. (2011, May 31). How do creative ads shake up the way we think?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110509114025.htm
University of Chicago Press Journals. "How do creative ads shake up the way we think?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110509114025.htm (accessed April 17, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Are School Dress Codes Too Strict?

Are School Dress Codes Too Strict?

AP (Apr. 16, 2014) Pushing the limits on style and self-expression is a rite of passage for teens and even younger kids. How far should schools go with their dress codes? The courts have sided with schools in an era when school safety is paramount. (April 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) A new study conducted by researchers at Northwestern and Harvard suggests even casual marijuana use can alter your brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Couples Who Sleep Less Than An Inch Apart Might Be Happiest

Couples Who Sleep Less Than An Inch Apart Might Be Happiest

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) A new study by British researchers suggests couples' sleeping positions might reflect their happiness. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cognitive Function: Is It All Downhill From Age 24?

Cognitive Function: Is It All Downhill From Age 24?

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) A new study out of Canada says cognitive motor performance begins deteriorating around age 24. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins