Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Significant inverse association between public spending on health and pandemic influenza mortality

Date:
May 12, 2011
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
Pandemic A (H1N1) 2009 mortality rates exhibited wide diversion between countries. Based on data from a total of 30 European countries, a new study finds that the greater the state financial "generosity" to health sector the lower the pandemic influenza mortality.

Pandemic A (H1N1) 2009 mortality rates exhibited wide diversion between countries. Based on data from a total of 30 European countries, a study published in the journal PLoS ONE has found that the greater the state financial "generosity" to health sector the lower the pandemic influenza mortality.

Related Articles


The study was conducted by a Greek team of researchers; Georgios Nikolopoulos, DDS, MSc, PhD, epidemiologist at the Hellenic Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (HCDCP), Athens; Pantelis Bagos, BSc, MSc, PhD, Assistant Professor at the University of Central Greece, Lamia; Theodoros Lytras, MD, MPH, public health officer at the Department of Epidemiological Surveillance and Intervention, HCDCP, Athens; and Stefanos Bonovas, MD, MSc, PhD, Head of the Department of Epidemiological Surveillance and Intervention, HCDCP, Athens, Greece.

Using data from 30 European countries, the investigators applied advanced statistical methods to examine the relationship between pandemic mortality rates and a set of representative environmental, health care-associated, economic and demographic country-level parameters. The study indicated a significant inverse association between public spending on health and pandemic influenza mortality; i.e. a rise of 100 international dollars in the per capita government expenditure on health was associated with a reduction in the pandemic influenza mortality rate by approximately 2.8 percent.

This finding adds to the existing evidence that reduced public expenditure allocations to the health sector have adverse consequences for the health of populations. Yet, at the present time of economic recession, governments are called to implement programs of macroeconomic stability balancing their limited budget and, consequently, decreasing public health spending. "The more you spend the more you get" people used to say, but, do government money matter in improving population health? "There are indeed health gains achieved through increased public expenditures on health. Based on the results of the current study and taking also into account the accumulated evidence that public health investments are valuable in saving human lives, policy makers, within the context of economic stabilization, need to safeguard budgetary allocations to the health sector," says Dr. Nikolopoulos.

However, further work needs to be done, to unravel the mechanisms by which reduced government spending on health may have affected the 2009 pandemic influenza mortality. These mechanisms may include, among others, limited access to medical care services, low quality of health system resources, inadequate numbers of health workers, underfunded influenza pandemic preparedness and ineffective public health interventions. As Dr. Bonovas points out "These have long been fundamental concerns for public health, and global health policies should place more emphasis on these issues."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Georgios Nikolopoulos, Pantelis Bagos, Theodoros Lytras, Stefanos Bonovas. An Ecological Study of the Determinants of Differences in 2009 Pandemic Influenza Mortality Rates between Countries in Europe. PLoS ONE, 2011; 6 (5): e19432 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0019432

Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Significant inverse association between public spending on health and pandemic influenza mortality." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 May 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110512092718.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2011, May 12). Significant inverse association between public spending on health and pandemic influenza mortality. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110512092718.htm
Public Library of Science. "Significant inverse association between public spending on health and pandemic influenza mortality." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110512092718.htm (accessed February 1, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, February 1, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Hikers Rescued After Fall from Oregon Mountain

Hikers Rescued After Fall from Oregon Mountain

AP (Feb. 1, 2015) Two climbers who were hurt in a fall on Mount Hood are now being treated for their injuries. Rescue officials say they were airlifted off the mountain Saturday afternoon by an Oregon National Guard helicopter. (Feb. 2) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smart Glasses Augment Reality to Help Visually Impaired

Smart Glasses Augment Reality to Help Visually Impaired

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Feb. 1, 2015) New augmented reality smart glasses developed by researchers at Oxford University can help people with visual impairments improve their vision by providing depth-based feedback, allowing users to "see" better. Joel Flynn reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Flu Season Hitting Elderly Hard

Flu Season Hitting Elderly Hard

Reuters - US Online Video (Jan. 31, 2015) The CDC says this year&apos;s flu season is hitting people 65 years of age and older especially hard. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC: Get Vaccinated for Measles

CDC: Get Vaccinated for Measles

Reuters - US Online Video (Jan. 30, 2015) The CDC is urging people to get vaccinated for measles amid an outbreak that began at Disneyland and has now infected more than 90 people. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins