Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Mexico social distancing reduced flu transmission: H1N1 study shows closing schools, other measures effective

Date:
May 24, 2011
Source:
Arizona State University
Summary:
Social distancing measures proved effective according to a new study that examined the H1N1 pandemic in Mexico. The study shows three distinct pandemic waves. Results will aid health officials plan for future pandemics.

Schools were closed, restaurants shuttered and large public gatherings cancelled. The H1N1 virus was new, and most of the cases occurred among young people. Health professionals and scientists weren't sure at the onset what the world would encounter with the virus.

Related Articles


Social distancing measures were enacted in Mexico where the pandemic affected different geographical areas of the country during three distinct waves. During the spring of 2009 when the virus affected the Mexico City area, officials choose to take measures to limit the virus' spread including cancelling large gatherings like soccer games.

New evidence suggests that these measures were effective, according to a new study led by ASU assistant professor Gerardo Chowell-Puente, an investigator for the Fogarty International Center at the National Institutes of Health and an assistant professor in the Arizona State University School of Human Evolution and Social Change in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

The study provides the first comprehensive epidemiological description of the age, geographical and severity pattern of the 2009 pandemic in Mexico. Results of the study will be published in PloS Medicine.

"The interesting finding is that school closures and other social distancing measures during the first wave were associated with a reduction in the transmission rate by approximately 29 to 37 percent," Chowell said. "That is a significant change for a rapidly disseminating pandemic virus." Approximately 1,500 deaths were directly attributed to H1N1 flu in Mexico during 2009, he added.

In addition, hospitalization rates declined from about 70 percent to 10 percent during the period when schools closed and other social distancing measures enacted. Results of the study were calculated by applying mathematical modeling to influenza surveillance data compiled by the Mexican Institute for Social Security, a private health system representing 40 percent of the population.

"We found a significant effect from the social distancing interventions that could help mitigate the impact of future pandemics by relieving the burden on hospitals," Chowell said. "The peak of the pandemic could be pushed farther away so that health officials can prepare with pharmaceuticals and anti-virals. A vaccine could potentially be developed during that time."

More young people were affected by the H1N1 virus since older people had some immunity after a similar strain circulated years ago.

"There were a significant number of young people with severe respiratory disease particularly during the early pandemic phase," Chowell said.

Researchers also examined how the virus spread spatially, identifying three H1N1 waves with the first cases primarily around the Mexico City metropolis in spring of 2009 and the second summer wave in southeastern Mexico. The third wave was more widespread throughout the country and coincided with the start of school during the fall.

Findings from the study have implications for improving preparedness plans in future pandemics, said Chowell, who noted that in a previous pandemic in the 19th century, the majority of deaths occurred two years after the initial wave.

"We must remain vigilant and continue to monitor the circulation and health burden of this flu virus in the coming years," he added.

The study is a collaborative effort by Fogarty International Center (the international component of the National Institutes of Health), Arizona State University and colleagues at the Mexican Institute for Social Security.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Arizona State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Gerardo Chowell, Santiago Echevarría-Zuno, Cécile Viboud, Lone Simonsen, James Tamerius, Mark A. Miller, Víctor H. Borja-Aburto. Characterizing the Epidemiology of the 2009 Influenza A/H1N1 Pandemic in Mexico. PLoS Medicine, 2011; 8 (5): e1000436 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1000436

Cite This Page:

Arizona State University. "Mexico social distancing reduced flu transmission: H1N1 study shows closing schools, other measures effective." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 May 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110524171253.htm>.
Arizona State University. (2011, May 24). Mexico social distancing reduced flu transmission: H1N1 study shows closing schools, other measures effective. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 25, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110524171253.htm
Arizona State University. "Mexico social distancing reduced flu transmission: H1N1 study shows closing schools, other measures effective." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110524171253.htm (accessed April 25, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, April 25, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

85 Killed in Niger by Meningitis Since Start of Year

85 Killed in Niger by Meningitis Since Start of Year

AFP (Apr. 24, 2015) — A meningitis outbreak in Niger has killed 85 people since the start of the year prompting authorities to close schools in the capital Niamey until Monday. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
C-Section Births a Trend in Brazil

C-Section Births a Trend in Brazil

AFP (Apr. 24, 2015) — More than half of Brazil&apos;s babies are born via cesarean section, as mothers and doctors opt for a faster and less painful experience despite the health risks. Duration: 02:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Anti-Malaria Jab Hope

Anti-Malaria Jab Hope

Reuters - News Video Online (Apr. 24, 2015) — The world&apos;s first anti-malaria vaccine could get the go-ahead for use in Africa from October if approved by international regulators. Paul Chapman reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
3D Food Printing: The Meal of the Future?

3D Food Printing: The Meal of the Future?

AP (Apr. 23, 2015) — Developers of 3D food printing hope the culinary technology will revolutionize the way we cook and eat. (April 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins