Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Effects of celiac disease on bone mineral density are pronounced in lumbar spine than femoral neck

Date:
May 26, 2011
Source:
European League Against Rheumatism
Summary:
Patients with celiac disease are more than 4.5 times more likely to develop osteoporosis compared to healthy people in an age and gender matched cohort with no identifiable risk factors for osteoporosis, according to a new study.

Patients with celiac disease are more than 4.5 times more likely to develop osteoporosis compared to healthy people in an age and gender matched cohort with no identifiable risk factors for osteoporosis, according to a study presented at the EULAR 2011 Annual Congress.

The British study of 1,030 people compares the extent of bone mineral density (BMD)* loss -- a common measure of osteoporosis -- in two physical locations in the body. The results demonstrated that the mean BMD of the lumbar spine in patients with coeliac disease was significantly different when compared to the control group (1.79 (95% CI 1.32, 2.44)), however not for the femoral neck vs. control (1.52 (95% CI 0.86, 2.67)).

"This is the first study that compares the extent of BMD loss at the lumbar spine and femoral neck in an age and sex matched cohort, and demonstrates that the detrimental effects of coeliac disease are most pronounced in the lower back compared to the hip joint," said Mr Oldroyd of Lancaster University School of Medicine. "These findings may be due to the fact that the bone in the lumbar spine is spongy, less dense and weaker in comparison to the femoral neck, causing it to be more susceptible to the detrimental effects of coeliac disease. There is greater research required to determine why this effect is seen and whether it can have future implications for treatment."

The authors from Lancaster and the Liverpool area collected results of DEXA scans (used to measure BMD) from 1,030 patients with coeliac disease between June 2004 and September 2007. Scan results of the lumbar spine and femoral neck of patients with coeliac disease were compared to a healthy, age and gender matched cohort, with no identifiable risk factors for osteoporosis. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association between coeliac disease and BMD results for the lumbar spine and femoral neck in the lowest tertile of the whole study cohort.

*BMD refers to the amount of matter per cubic centimeter of bones. Measurements are most commonly made over the lumbar spine and over the upper part of the hip. Average density is around 1500 kg m−3. BMD is often measured with a t-score, the number of standard deviations above or below the mean for a healthy 30 year old adult of the same sex and ethnicity as the patient. Average t-scores are as follows:

T-score:

  • Normal: Less than 1 standard deviation (SD) below the young adult reference range (more than -1)
  • Low bone mass (osteopenia): 1 to 2.5 SDs below the young adult reference range (-1 to -2.5)
  • Osteoporosis: 2.5 or more SDs below the young adult reference range (-2.5 or less)

Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by European League Against Rheumatism. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

European League Against Rheumatism. "Effects of celiac disease on bone mineral density are pronounced in lumbar spine than femoral neck." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 May 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110526064753.htm>.
European League Against Rheumatism. (2011, May 26). Effects of celiac disease on bone mineral density are pronounced in lumbar spine than femoral neck. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110526064753.htm
European League Against Rheumatism. "Effects of celiac disease on bone mineral density are pronounced in lumbar spine than femoral neck." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110526064753.htm (accessed October 2, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) A new study says children born less than one year and more than five years after a sibling can have an increased risk for autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robotic Hair Restoration

Robotic Hair Restoration

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A new robotic procedure is changing the way we transplant hair. The ARTAS robot leaves no linear scarring and provides more natural results. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A heart monitor the size of a paperclip that can save your life. The “Reveal Linq” allows a doctor to monitor patients with A-Fib on a continuous basis for up to 3 years! Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Attacking Superbugs

Attacking Superbugs

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) Two weapons hospitals can use to attack superbugs. Scientists in Ireland created a new gel resistant to superbugs, and a robot that can disinfect a room in minutes. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins