Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Use of social media on the rise in Sweden

Date:
June 14, 2011
Source:
University of Gothenburg
Summary:
Every year, researchers take a 'barometer reading' of media use in Sweden. Media barometer data were first collected in 1979. These are some of the findings of the 2010 survey.

Every year, Nordicom at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden takes a barometer reading of media use in Sweden. Media Barometer data were first collected in 1979. These are some of the findings of the 2010 survey.

Among 15- to 24-year-olds eight in ten use social media the average day, 15 per cent more than in 2009. An even sharper increase -- from 32 to 49 per cent -- is noted among 25- to 44-year-olds. The time people in these younger ages devote to the media overall has rested at about 6.5 hours a day over the past few years, but within these hours media habits have changed. In 2010, internet claimed 40 per cent of this time, up from 34 per cent one year earlier. In all other age groups, television viewing still dominates (children and people older than 44 years).

Media habits have changed the most among elder teens and young adults (ages 15-44). The greatest impacts that may be attributed to increased use of internet are on radio listening and reading of magazines and books among young people (15-24), but on reading of newspapers among those aged 25-44. The share of newspaper subscribers among this latter group has fallen by 16 percentage points in the past decade, compared to a decline of 7 points among the population as a whole.

Use of traditional media -- newspapers, television and radio -- on the web has steadily increased, but the rise last year was relatively slight: 28 per cent of the population visited the websites of traditional media the average day in 2010. Those aged 25-44 were the most frequent users. The tabloid press is the only category that may be said to have become fully established on the web in terms of the numbers of users. Roughly one in four in the age group 25-44 years uses no other media besides tabloids on the web.

Six per cent of the population as a whole report watching television on a computer, cell phone or other device; the figure is 10 per cent among youth. The great majority, over 80 per cent, still watch television on an ordinary TV set.

The biggest contrast between men's and women's media habits is the difference noted in reading of books. A similar difference is noted between boys and girls, as well.

"While young men play computer games, young women are reading books for pleasure or blogging. The pattern is in line with the patterns of media use our Barometers have found in these two groups over the years," says Professor Ulla Carlsson, Director of Nordicom.

Forty per cent of Swedish women read books for pleasure the average day, compared to 24 per cent among men. Education is a strong factor with regard to book reading. College- and university-educated individuals tend to read books more, 42 per cent the average day, compared to 22 per cent among those who have no higher education. Book reading as a pastime is about twice as frequent among individuals in senior managerial and academic positions as among people in so-called 'blue-collar" occupations.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Gothenburg. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Gothenburg. "Use of social media on the rise in Sweden." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 June 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110614115039.htm>.
University of Gothenburg. (2011, June 14). Use of social media on the rise in Sweden. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110614115039.htm
University of Gothenburg. "Use of social media on the rise in Sweden." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110614115039.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

Share This



More Science & Society News

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Some Tobacco Farmers Thrive Amid Challenges

Some Tobacco Farmers Thrive Amid Challenges

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) The South's tobacco country is surviving, and even thriving in some cases, as demand overseas keeps growers in the fields of one of America's oldest cash crops. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Space Race Pits Bezos Vs Musk

Space Race Pits Bezos Vs Musk

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 16, 2014) Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' startup will team up with Boeing and Lockheed to develop rocket engines as Elon Musk races to have his rockets certified. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) President Obama is expected to send 3,000 troops to West Africa as part of the effort to contain Ebola's spread. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
EU Ministers and Experts Meet to Discuss Ebola Reponse

EU Ministers and Experts Meet to Discuss Ebola Reponse

AFP (Sep. 15, 2014) The European Commission met on Monday to coordinate aid that the EU can offer to African countries affected by the Ebola outbreak. Duration: 00:58 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

      Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins