Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

200,000 patients treated for cardiac arrest annually in US hospitals, study shows

Date:
June 24, 2011
Source:
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Summary:
More than 200,000 people are treated for cardiac arrest in United States hospitals each year, a rate that may be on the rise, according to a new study.

More than 200,000 people are treated for cardiac arrest in United States hospitals each year, a rate that may be on the rise. The findings are reported online in Critical Care Medicine in a University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine-led study.

Though cardiac arrest is known to be a chief contributor to in-hospital deaths, no uniform reporting requirements exist across the nation, leaving experts previously unable to calculate its true incidence and study trends in cardiac arrest mortality and best practices in resuscitation care.

The authors, led by Raina M. Merchant, MD, MS, an assistant professor of Emergency Medicine, used three different approaches -- involving the American Heart Association's Get With the Guidelines data, a voluntary registry of hospital resuscitation events -to estimate the total number of treated cardiac arrests that take place in United States hospitals each year.

While some of these events occur among terminally ill patients, the authors suggest that many of the cardiac arrests they catalogued may be preventable through better monitoring of patients, quicker response time to administer CPR and defibrillation, and improved adherence to best practices in resuscitation guidelines. Patients who suffer in-hospital cardiac arrests are more than twice as likely to survive than those who arrest in public settings -- 21 percent survive to go home, compared to less than 10 percent of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients -- but both areas suggest opportunities to improve and standardize care.

"Our study proves that cardiac arrest represents a tremendous problem for hospitals in the United States," Merchant says. "Until now, we could only guess about how many patients were suffering these events. It's impossible to make improvements in something we can't measure. These numbers finally provide us with a roadmap for improving allocation of resources to care for these critically ill patients and further our study of ways to identify patients who are at risk of cardiac arrest in the hospital and improve survival."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. "200,000 patients treated for cardiac arrest annually in US hospitals, study shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 June 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110624130029.htm>.
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. (2011, June 24). 200,000 patients treated for cardiac arrest annually in US hospitals, study shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110624130029.htm
University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. "200,000 patients treated for cardiac arrest annually in US hospitals, study shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110624130029.htm (accessed August 22, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, August 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Drug Used To Treat 'Ebola's Cousin' Shows Promise

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) An experimental drug used to treat Marburg virus in rhesus monkeys could give new insight into a similar treatment for Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cadavers, a Teen, and a Medical School Dream

Cadavers, a Teen, and a Medical School Dream

AP (Aug. 21, 2014) Contains graphic content. He's only 17. But Johntrell Bowles has wanted to be a doctor from a young age, despite the odds against him. He was recently the youngest participant in a cadaver program at the Indiana University NW medical school. (Aug. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
American Ebola Patients Released: What Cured Them?

American Ebola Patients Released: What Cured Them?

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) It's unclear whether the American Ebola patients' recoveries can be attributed to an experimental drug or early detection and good medical care. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Lost Brain Cells To Blame For Sleep Problems Among Seniors

Lost Brain Cells To Blame For Sleep Problems Among Seniors

Newsy (Aug. 21, 2014) According to a new study, elderly people might have trouble sleeping because of the loss of a certain group of neurons in the brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins