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Friendship, timing key differences between US, Eastern European love

Date:
August 17, 2011
Source:
SAGE Publications
Summary:
The importance of friendship in romantic love and the time it takes to perceive falling in love are two key differences in how residents in the US, Lithuania and Russia see romantic love, according to a recent study.

The importance of friendship in romantic love and the time it takes to perceive falling in love are two key differences in how residents in the US, Lithuania and Russia see romantic love, according to a study recently published in Cross-Cultural Research, a SAGE journal.

The study examined how men and women defined romantic love through the use of surveys and used the results to find some commonalities and differences among the countries. Researchers found that residents of all three countries listed "being together" as their top requirement of romantic love. From there, the notion of romantic love seemed to diverge with the US respondents having different views than Lithuanian and Russian counterparts.

"The idea that romantic love was temporary and inconsequential was frequently cited by Lithuanian and Russian informants," wrote authors Victor C. de Munck, Andrey Korotayev, Janina de Munck and Darya Khaltourina. "but not by U.S. informants. Furthermore, we noted that expressions of 'comfort /love' and 'friendship' were frequently cited by the U.S. informants and seldom to never by our Eastern European informants."

Additionally, the data looked at how long it took before respondents fell in love. Americans took longer than their Eastern European counterparts with more than 58 percent saying it look two months to a year. On the contrary, more than 90 percent of Lithuanians report falling in love within a month.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by SAGE Publications. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. V. C. de Munck, A. Korotayev, J. de Munck, D. Khaltourina. Cross-Cultural Analysis of Models of Romantic Love Among U.S. Residents, Russians, and Lithuanians. Cross-Cultural Research, 2011; 45 (2): 128 DOI: 10.1177/1069397110393313

Cite This Page:

SAGE Publications. "Friendship, timing key differences between US, Eastern European love." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 August 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110817083259.htm>.
SAGE Publications. (2011, August 17). Friendship, timing key differences between US, Eastern European love. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110817083259.htm
SAGE Publications. "Friendship, timing key differences between US, Eastern European love." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110817083259.htm (accessed April 20, 2014).

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