Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Modeling disparities may help with cervical cancer prevention

Date:
September 6, 2011
Source:
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Summary:
Researchers reported that explicit inclusion of disparities in cost-effectiveness analysis, would allow policy makers to identify strategies that would reduce overall cancer risk, reduce disparities between racial ethnic subgroups, and be cost-effective, according to a new study.

Researchers reported that explicit inclusion of disparities in cost-effectiveness analysis, would allow policy makers to identify strategies that would reduce overall cancer risk, reduce disparities between racial ethnic subgroups, and be cost-effective, according to a study published online September 6 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Related Articles


Disease simulation models can be used to identify effective and cost-effective strategies for reducing overall cancer incidence and mortality, but are sometimes criticized for not considering how the benefits are distributed within the population. Advances in computer-based modeling, together with the availability of better data, allows details to now be included that account for inequalities between different population subgroups.

To provide a framework for how health inequities could be more explicitly considered in model-based cost-effectiveness analysis, Sue J. Goldie, MD, MPH, and Norman Daniels, Ph.D., of the Harvard School of Public Health, devised a typology of cancer disparities among black, white, and Hispanic populations in the United States that differentiated inequalities resulting from different factors, such as access and quality of treatment and prevention. They used this typology to guide an evaluation of different cervical cancer screening and vaccination strategies in which the health and economic outcomes were calculated for the average population, and also for the three racial subgroups separately.

The researchers identified strategies that reduced the overall risk of cervical cancer from 60% to 74.5%, and that improved cancer outcomes in all racial subgroups. However, they also found that the benefits were unequally distributed; for example, while current screening patterns would resulted in a 60% reduction in overall cancer incidence, reductions ranged from 54.8% for Hispanic women to 62.5% for white women.

The researchers found that screening strategies that directly targeted racial subgroups bearing the greatest inequalities, when combined with vaccination, provided a more equitable distribution of benefits. For example, reduction in cervical cancer incidence was 69.7% in white women versus 70.1% in Hispanic women. These strategies were also more effective and less costly than current screening patterns.

The authors conclude that modeling disparities in cancer prevention can identify strategies that will improve overall population health, distribute health benefits fairly, and utilize health care resources efficiently. They write, "These points of convergence are 'win-win' in the sense that they have the biggest positive impact in worst-off groups as well as on population health overall.

Our claim is that such win-win strategies are most desirable from the perspective of both goals of health policy, population health improvement, and health equity."

In an accompanying editorial, Kevin A. Ault, M.D., of the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics at Emory University School of Medicine writes that the introduction of the HPV vaccines into the world of medicine has made cervical cancer prevention a reality. Ault agrees with the study's conclusions on the utility of modeling, particularly that, "modeling of racial and ethnic subgroups at increased risk identifies strategies that can reduce cancer burden among these groups." Ault adds that since recent research has identified HPV vaccination and diagnostic testing as potential improvements to the Pap smear in cervical cancer prevention, these strategies should be made available to all women.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Journal of the National Cancer Institute. "Modeling disparities may help with cervical cancer prevention." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 September 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110906161628.htm>.
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (2011, September 6). Modeling disparities may help with cervical cancer prevention. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110906161628.htm
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. "Modeling disparities may help with cervical cancer prevention." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110906161628.htm (accessed November 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

UN Says It Will Scale Up Its Ebola Response

UN Says It Will Scale Up Its Ebola Response

AFP (Nov. 20, 2014) UN Resident Coordinator David McLachlan-Karr and WHO representative in the country Daniel Kertesz updated the media on the UN Ebola response on Wednesday. Duration: 00:51 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Takata Offers "sincerest Condolences" To Victims of Malfunctioning Airbag

Takata Offers "sincerest Condolences" To Victims of Malfunctioning Airbag

Reuters - US Online Video (Nov. 20, 2014) U.S. Congress hears from a victim and company officials as it holds a hearing on the safety of Takata airbags after reports of injuries. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obesity Costs Almost As Much As War And Terrorism

Obesity Costs Almost As Much As War And Terrorism

Newsy (Nov. 20, 2014) The newest estimate of the cost of obesity is pretty jarring — $2 trillion. But how did researchers get to that number? Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Calling All Men: Here's Your Chance to Experience Labor Pains

Calling All Men: Here's Your Chance to Experience Labor Pains

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Nov. 20, 2014) Chinese hospital offers men a chance to experience the pain of child birth via electric shocks. Sharon Reich reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins