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Tiny magnetic particles may help assess heart treatments

Date:
July 10, 2012
Source:
American Heart Association
Summary:
An initial human study shows magnetic particles can track cells as they move through the body. The technique could be used to evaluate cell-based heart disease treatments.

Tiny magnetic particles may help doctors track cells in the body to better determine if treatments work, according to research reported in Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, an American Heart Association journal.

Researchers showed that injecting immune cells containing magnetic particles into the bloodstream was safe and did not interfere with cell function. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans can then track the cells moving through the body.

"This could change how we assess new treatments affecting inflammation and the outcome of a heart attack or heart failure," said Jennifer Richards, M.D., lead author and vascular surgeon at the University of Edinburgh's Centre for Cardiovascular Science in Scotland.

With stem cell therapy, doctors can adapt blood cells to fight disease. But when developing these therapies, it's hard to tell exactly where cells go and how many go where they are supposed to. Safely tracking them would help scientists better understand how new therapies combat heart disease.

Other tracing methods expose patients to excess radiation or only allow cells to be tracked for a few hours. But MRI scans use no radiation, and cells containing the particles can be monitored for at least a week.

Using test tubes, Richards' team first determined that magnetically labeled blood cells move and thrive like normal ones.

Then, they did four small-scale tests in humans:

  • Six people were successfully given three thigh muscle injections of unlabeled cells, magnetically labeled cells, and an injection of just the magnetic material. The labeled cells were traceable up to seven days later.
  • Two people were given six increasingly larger doses of magnetically labeled blood cells through a vein, and they had no negative effects.
  • 12 people got intravenous injections of the labeled blood cells -- six getting a high dose and six a low dose -- which were traceable by MRI a week later.
  • To test how well the cells travel to inflammation sites, one person was injected with the labeled blood cells, which were successfully followed by an MRI as the cells moved to an inflamed area of skin on the thigh. "This demonstrates that this method may be useful to facilitate the development of cell-based therapies in the future," Richards said.

Richards said more human tests are needed before researchers can regularly use magnetically labeled cells.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Heart Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jennifer M.J. Richards, Catherine A. Shaw, Ninian N. Lang, Michelle C. Williams, Scott I.K. Semple, Thomas J. MacGillivray, Calum Gray, Julie H. Crawford, Shirjel R. Alam, Anne P.M. Atkinson, Elaine K. Forrest, Carol Bienek, Nicholas L. Mills, Anne Burdess, Kev Dhaliwal, A. John Simpson, William A. Wallace, Adam T. Hill, P. Huw Roddie, Graham McKillop, Thomas A. Connolly, Giora Z. Feuerstein, G. Robin Barclay, Marc L. Turner, and David E. Newby. In Vivo Mononuclear Cell Tracking Using Superparamagnetic Particles of Iron Oxide: Feasibility and Safety in Humans. Circ Cardiovasc Imaging, July 10 2012 DOI: 10.1161/CIRCIMAGING.112.972596

Cite This Page:

American Heart Association. "Tiny magnetic particles may help assess heart treatments." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 July 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120710163345.htm>.
American Heart Association. (2012, July 10). Tiny magnetic particles may help assess heart treatments. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120710163345.htm
American Heart Association. "Tiny magnetic particles may help assess heart treatments." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120710163345.htm (accessed July 22, 2014).

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