Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Development of 'Slater insulator' that rapidly changes from conductor to insulator at room temperature

Date:
July 11, 2012
Source:
National Institute for Materials Science
Summary:
Scientists have succeeded in developing a Slater insulator which functions at room temperature.

(Left) Photograph of a crystal of Perovskite type osmium oxide and (right) schematic diagram of its crystal structure. White circles: sodium ions, red circles: oxygen ions. Osmium ions exist in the central part of the octahedron.
Credit: Copyright NIMS

Dr. Kazunari Yamaura, a Principal Researcher of the Strongly Correlated Materials Group, Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS; President: Sukekatsu Ushioda), in joint work with a research group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the United States, succeeded in development of a Slater insulator which functions at room temperature.

Slater insulators have been studied for more than 50 years as insulators with special properties. Although Slater insulators display the properties of metals at a sufficiently high temperature, they become insulators when cooled to a certain temperature (transition temperature) peculiar to the substance concerned. Because this transition temperature was conventionally far lower than room temperature, study had been limited to scientific research, and virtually no research had been done aiming at development to applications.

This research clarified the fact that a new material (Perovskite type osmium oxide), which was synthesized for the first time by NIMS in 2009, is the Slater insulator with the highest transition temperature to date. This result was verified through joint experimental research with a research group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the United States using the neutron diffraction method.

Because this new material displays the characteristics of a Slater insulator at room temperature without requiring cooling, it is not only scientifically interesting, but also has the potential for development to application as a new material. If further progress can be achieved in research with this new material as a starting point, there is a possibility that new materials and devices with unprecedented functions can be developed. Concretely, application to solid state devices for detecting signals in the terahertz region, new thermoelectric conversion materials, etc. is considered possible. In the future, research will be carried out aiming at development of new materials with possible practical applications.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Institute for Materials Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. S. Calder, V. Garlea, D. McMorrow, M. Lumsden, M. Stone, J. Lang, J.-W. Kim, J. Schlueter, Y. Shi, K. Yamaura, Y. Sun, Y. Tsujimoto, A. Christianson. Magnetically Driven Metal-Insulator Transition in NaOsO_{3}. Physical Review Letters, 2012; 108 (25) DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.257209

Cite This Page:

National Institute for Materials Science. "Development of 'Slater insulator' that rapidly changes from conductor to insulator at room temperature." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 July 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120711134534.htm>.
National Institute for Materials Science. (2012, July 11). Development of 'Slater insulator' that rapidly changes from conductor to insulator at room temperature. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120711134534.htm
National Institute for Materials Science. "Development of 'Slater insulator' that rapidly changes from conductor to insulator at room temperature." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120711134534.htm (accessed August 28, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Australian Airlines Relax Phone Ban Too

Australian Airlines Relax Phone Ban Too

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 26, 2014) Qantas and Virgin say passengers can use their smartphones and tablets throughout flights after a regulator relaxed a ban on electronic devices during take-off and landing. As Hayley Platt reports the move comes as the two domestic rivals are expected to post annual net losses later this week. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hurricane Marie Brings Big Waves to California Coast

Hurricane Marie Brings Big Waves to California Coast

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 26, 2014) Huge waves generated by Hurricane Marie hit the Southern California coast. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chinese Researchers Might Be Creating Supersonic Submarine

Chinese Researchers Might Be Creating Supersonic Submarine

Newsy (Aug. 26, 2014) Chinese researchers have expanded on Cold War-era tech and are closer to building a submarine that could reach the speed of sound. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Breakingviews: India Coal Strained by Supreme Court Ruling

Breakingviews: India Coal Strained by Supreme Court Ruling

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 26, 2014) An acute coal shortage is likely to be aggravated as India's supreme court declared government coal allocations illegal, says Breakingviews' Peter Thal Larsen. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins