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Better understanding of memory retrieval between children and adults

Date:
July 24, 2012
Source:
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research
Summary:
Neuroscientists are taking a deeper look into how the brain mechanisms for memory retrieval differ between adults and children. While the memory systems are the same in many ways, the researchers have learned that crucial functions with relevance to learning and education differ.
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Neuroscientists from Wayne State University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are taking a deeper look into how the brain mechanisms for memory retrieval differ between adults and children. While the memory systems are the same in many ways, the researchers have learned that crucial functions with relevance to learning and education differ.

The team's findings were published on July 17, 2012, in the Journal of Neuroscience.

According to lead author Noa Ofen, Ph.D., assistant professor in WSU's Institute of Gerontology and Department of Pediatrics, cognitive ability, including the ability to learn and remember new information, dramatically changes between childhood and adulthood. This ability parallels with dramatic changes that occur in the structure and function of the brain during these periods.

In the study, "The Development of Brain Systems Associated with Successful Memory Retrieval of Scenes," Ofen and her collaborative team tested the development of neural underpinnings of memory from childhood to young adulthood. The team of researchers exposed participants to pictures of scenes and then showed them the same scenes mixed with new ones and asked them to judge whether each picture was presented earlier. Participants made retrieval judgments while researchers collected images of their brains with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Using this method, the researchers were able to see how the brain remembers. "Our results suggest that cortical regions related to attentional or strategic control show the greatest developmental changes for memory retrieval," said Ofen.

The researchers said that older participants used the cortical regions more than younger participants when correctly retrieving past experiences.

"We were interested to see whether there are changes in the connectivity of regions in the brain that support memory retrieval," Ofen added. "We found changes in connectivity of memory-related regions. In particular, the developmental change in connectivity between regions was profound even without a developmental change in the recruitment of those regions, suggesting that functional brain connectivity is an important aspect of developmental changes in the brain."

This study marks the first time that the development of connectivity within memory systems in the brain has been tested, and the results suggest that the brain continues to rearrange connections to achieve adult-like performance during development.

Ofen and her research team plan to continue research in this area, focused on modeling brain network connectivity, and applying these methods to study abnormal brain development.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Noa Ofen, Xiaoqian J. Chai, Karen D. I. Schuil, Susan Whitfield-Gabrieli, and John D. E. Gabrieli. The Development of Brain Systems Associated with Successful Memory Retrieval of Scenes. The Journal of Neuroscience, 18 July 2012, 32(29):10012-10020 DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1082-11.2012

Cite This Page:

Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research. "Better understanding of memory retrieval between children and adults." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 July 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120724115105.htm>.
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research. (2012, July 24). Better understanding of memory retrieval between children and adults. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120724115105.htm
Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research. "Better understanding of memory retrieval between children and adults." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120724115105.htm (accessed September 1, 2015).

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