Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Cyberbullying: One in two victims suffer from distribution of embarrassing photos and videos

Date:
July 25, 2012
Source:
Universitaet Bielefeld
Summary:
Embarrassing personal photos and videos circulating in the Internet: researchers have discovered that young people who fall victim to cyberbullying or cyber harassment suffer most when fellow students make them objects of ridicule by distributing photographic material. According to an online survey, about half of the victims feel very distressed or severely distressed by this type of behavior.

Embarrassing personal photos and videos circulating in the Internet: researchers at Bielefeld University have discovered that young people who fall victim to cyberbullying or cyber harassment suffer most when fellow pupils make them objects of ridicule by distributing photographic material.

According to an online survey published on 19 July, about half of the victims feel very distressed or severely distressed by this type of behaviour. 1,881 schoolchildren living in Germany took part in the survey conducted by the Institute for Interdisciplinary Research on Conflict and Violence (IKG) and commented on their experiences with cyberbullying as a victim, offender or witness.

Cyberbullying is the term used for attacks by one or more persons through the Internet or by mobile phone -- where Facebook or an instant messenger, for instance, are used to denigrate or humiliate someone or harm their social relationships. A weaker person is the target of repeated and intentional attacks. For social scientists Dr Peter Sitzer, Julia Marth and their team, the purpose of the study is to describe the various aspects of this phenomenon.

One focal point of the online survey was the degree of distress felt by the victim related to the various forms of cyberbullying. The survey discovered that those affected find some forms of cyberbullying more distressful than others. For instance, more than half of the victims considered the posting of personal photos and videos distressful if it was aimed at humiliating them or making them the object of ridicule. The researchers put these findings down to the fact that the impact of this form of cyberbullying is difficult to control; digital photos and videos can often be duplicated and distributed any number of times and thus made available to a potentially unlimited audience. In contrast, derisive, insulting, abusive and threatening behaviour was perceived as very distressful or severely distressful only by about a quarter of the respondents. "This might be because this form of cyberbullying can be aimed directly at the victim. In this case, there are relatively few witnesses," says Peter Sitzer. Another possibility is that the adolescents consider such attacks as normal, everyday behaviour among their peers.

The scientists also questioned the victims about the forms of cyberbullying they had experienced. Attacks through the Internet or by mobile phone, where they had been subjected to derision, insult, abuse or threats were reported especially frequently by the victims questioned. In many instances, the victims also claimed that rumours had been spread about them or hateful comments made. Schoolgirls among the victims claimed comparatively often that they had been the subject of cyberstalking and that, against their will, someone had wanted to talk to them about sex. Very little or no previous knowledge of the victim is required for these acts. Only very seldom did the victims questioned report deeds requiring additional knowledge. "It's easy to send someone offensive messages by e-mail or instant messenger or post them on their wall, for example in Facebook," says Sitzer. "But for a bully to be able to pass on private messages or confidential information to third parties in order to humiliate or ridicule the victim, he must have knowledge of such messages or information."

The anonymous survey also gave the offenders of cyberbullying an opportunity to speak. They stated how they had attacked their victims in the Internet or by mobile phone. The offenders questioned reported most frequently that they had ridiculed, insulted, abused or threatened others. Defamatory behaviour and cyberstalking also received a frequent mention. While reports of being excluded from a group in the Internet were comparatively seldom among the victims, this form of cyberbullying was indicated frequently by the offenders. According to the researchers, one explanation for the discrepancy between the statements given by the victims and offenders could be that the victims often did not notice they had been excluded from a group. "Disparagements, however, are only hurtful when the victim perceives them as humiliating," says Peter Sitzer. He presumes that there is a similar reason behind the fact that more offenders claimed to have forwarded personal photos and videos of others to third parties than was actually reported by victims. This is because in order to humiliate or ridicule a victim, it is not necessary for the victim to learn that embarrassing photos of him are being circulated.

"Our findings underline that cyberbullying is not a trivial matter but a serious problem which demands preventive countermeasures," says Peter Sitzer. It is the task of parents, educationalists and teachers to teach schoolchildren how to behave in a socially responsible manner towards other users. At the same time, it is important that firm action be taken in cases of cyberbullying. More than half the offenders surveyed said that their attacks had not resulted in any negative consequences for them. However, the offenders also need help to change and refrain from making the attacks. In addition, the researchers point out that the victims of cyberbullying must be taken seriously and need help to overcome these experiences and return to an everyday life worth living.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Universitaet Bielefeld. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Universitaet Bielefeld. "Cyberbullying: One in two victims suffer from distribution of embarrassing photos and videos." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 July 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120725090048.htm>.
Universitaet Bielefeld. (2012, July 25). Cyberbullying: One in two victims suffer from distribution of embarrassing photos and videos. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120725090048.htm
Universitaet Bielefeld. "Cyberbullying: One in two victims suffer from distribution of embarrassing photos and videos." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120725090048.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

Share This




More Computers & Math News

Monday, September 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Apple's Rumored iWatch Could Cost $400

Apple's Rumored iWatch Could Cost $400

Newsy (Aug. 31, 2014) Apple is expected to charge a premium for its still-rumored wearable device. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Amazon Chases Netflix And HBO With Five New Pilots

Amazon Chases Netflix And HBO With Five New Pilots

Newsy (Aug. 31, 2014) Amazon has released another batch of five pilots, allowing viewers to vote on which shows will get full seasons on the company's streaming service. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Apple Wants Your iPhone To Become Your Wallet

Apple Wants Your iPhone To Become Your Wallet

Newsy (Aug. 31, 2014) Apple might soon announce a feature that would allow iPhones to act as a credit card when making payments in physical stores. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Young Entrepreneurs Get $100,000, If They Quit School

Young Entrepreneurs Get $100,000, If They Quit School

AFP (Aug. 29, 2014) Twenty college-age students are getting 100,000 dollars from a Silicon Valley leader and a chance to live in San Francisco in order to work on the start-up project of their dreams, but they have to quit school first. Duration: 02:20 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins