Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Active follow-up with telephone help can reduce deaths in chronic heart failure patients

Date:
September 12, 2012
Source:
Wiley
Summary:
Chronic heart failure patients are less likely to have died a year after discharge if they are involved in a programme of active follow-up once they have returned home than patients given standard care, according to a new Cochrane systematic review. These patients were also less likely to need to go back into hospital in the six months that follow discharge.

Chronic heart failure (CHF) patients are less likely to have died a year after discharge if they are involved in a programme of active follow-up once they have returned home than patients given standard care, according to a new Cochrane systematic review. These patients were also less likely to need to go back into hospital in the six months that follow discharge.

Related Articles


CHF is a serious condition, mainly affecting elderly people. It is becoming increasingly common as the population ages, and carries high risks of emergency hospitalisation and death. It affects around three to 20 per 1,000 of the general population, with figures rising to 10% of people aged between 80 and 89. In the UK, CHF consumes almost 2% of the National Health Service's budget, most of the cost being linked to hospital admissions.

A team of six researchers based in the UK and Australia examined 25 clinical trials with nearly 6,000 patients. The trials tested different methods of organising the care of CHF patients after they leave hospital. The researchers identified three types of care: 1) case-management interventions, where patients were intensively monitored by telephone calls and home visits, usually by a specialist nurse; 2) clinic interventions involving follow up in a specialist CHF clinic; 3) multidisciplinary interventions, in which a team of professionals bridged the gap between hospital admission and living back at home.

Patients who received case-management intervention had less 'all cause' mortality a year after discharge than those receiving usual care, although there were no differences at six months after discharge.

"We weren't able to identify the optimal components of case-management interventions, but telephone follow up by a specialist nurse was a very common element," says research spokesperson Stephanie Taylor.

Only two studies looked at multidisciplinary follow-up and in these there were fewer deaths from any cause than in groups of patients given usual care. More trials would be needed to confirm this finding. Follow-up in a clinic, however, was assessed in six trials, and here there was no real difference in all-cause mortality and readmission rates compared with people receiving usual care.

Given the number of people who have CHF, Taylor and her colleagues believe that there is a need for research that deliberately compares different approaches to follow up, in particular comparing interventions that last for only a few weeks after discharge, with ones that span much longer periods. She also thinks that trials should look carefully at the costs and cost-effectiveness of each approach.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Andrea Takeda, Stephanie JC Taylor, Rod S Taylor, Faisal Khan, Henry Krum, Martin Underwood. Clinical service organisation for heart failure. Cochrane Reviews, 2012; DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD002752.pub3

Cite This Page:

Wiley. "Active follow-up with telephone help can reduce deaths in chronic heart failure patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 September 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120911200516.htm>.
Wiley. (2012, September 12). Active follow-up with telephone help can reduce deaths in chronic heart failure patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120911200516.htm
Wiley. "Active follow-up with telephone help can reduce deaths in chronic heart failure patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120911200516.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) — A recent test of a prototype Ebola vaccine generated an immune response to the disease in subjects. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins