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When TV and marriage meet: TV's negative impact on romantic relationships

Date:
September 18, 2012
Source:
Taylor & Francis
Summary:
The status of a romantic relationship could be in jeopardy if the couple or an individual in the relationship are frequent television watchers, according to a new study.

The status of a romantic relationship could be in jeopardy if the couple or an individual in the relationship are frequent television watchers, according to a study from Albion College.

The study, just released electronically and soon to be published in the September 2012 issue of Mass Communication and Society, found that the more an individual believed in television portrayals of romance, the less likely they were to be committed to their relationships. In August 2012, several of the most-watched television shows (Burn Notice, True Blood, The Big Bang Theory, and Two and a Half Men) featured romantic relationships prominently throughout their episodes. This research is especially important at helping individuals understand the impact that television viewing can have on their relationships.

"In this study I found that people who believe the unrealistic portrayals on TV are actually less committed to their spouses and think their alternatives to their spouse are relatively attractive," Dr. Jeremy Osborn, the article's author said. "My hope would be that people would read this article and take a look at their own relationships and the relationships of those around them. How realistic are your expectations for your partner and where did those expectations come from?"

Over 390 married couples participated in the study. The participants responded to questions about their satisfaction with their current romantic relationship, relationship expectations, relationship commitment, belief in television portrayals of romantic relationships, viewing frequency, and several others that focused on their spousal relationship. The research also discovered that the more an individual believed in the television romance, the higher people believed their relationship costs were. Relationship "costs" include a person's loss of personal freedom, loss of time, or their partner's unattractive qualities.

"We live in a society that perpetually immerses itself in media images from both TV and the web, but most people have no sense of the ways those images are impacting them," Osborn said. "The rate of marriage failure in the U. S. is not dropping, and it is important for people to have a sense of what factors are leading to the failure of so many relationships."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Taylor & Francis. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jeremy L. Osborn. When TV and Marriage Meet: A Social Exchange Analysis of the Impact of Television Viewing on Marital Satisfaction and Commitment. Mass Communication and Society, 2012; 15 (5): 739 DOI: 10.1080/15205436.2011.618900

Cite This Page:

Taylor & Francis. "When TV and marriage meet: TV's negative impact on romantic relationships." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 September 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120918121322.htm>.
Taylor & Francis. (2012, September 18). When TV and marriage meet: TV's negative impact on romantic relationships. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120918121322.htm
Taylor & Francis. "When TV and marriage meet: TV's negative impact on romantic relationships." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/09/120918121322.htm (accessed August 30, 2014).

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