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How to check your skin for skin cancer

Date:
October 9, 2012
Source:
American Academy of Dermatology (AAD)
Summary:
Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States and finding spots that could be cancerous is as simple as looking at your skin. Now a new video, “Skin Self-Exam: How to Do,” from the American Academy of Dermatology demonstrates how to check your skin and what to look for.

Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States and finding spots that could be cancerous is as simple as looking at your skin. Now a new video, "Skin Self-Exam: How to Do," from the American Academy of Dermatology demonstrates how to check your skin and what to look for.

"Checking your skin for skin cancer only requires your eyes and a mirror. Involving a partner adds another set of eyes, which is especially helpful when checking the back and other hard-to-see areas," said Thomas E. Rohrer, MD, FAAD, a board-certified dermatologist in private practice in Chestnut Hill, Mass. "Examining your skin only takes a few minutes, but it could save your life."

When examining the skin, look for the ABCDEs of Melanoma and make an appointment with a board-certified dermatologist if any moles exhibit these signs:

A -- Asymmetry: One half of the spot is unlike the other half.

B -- Border: The spot has an irregular, scalloped or poorly defined border.

C -- Color: The spot has varying colors from one area to the next, such as shades of tan, brown, or black, or with areas of white, red or blue.

D -- Diameter: Melanomas are usually greater than 6mm, or about the size of a pencil eraser when they are diagnosed, but they can be smaller.

E -- Evolving: A mole or spot on your skin that looks different from the rest or is changing in size, shape, or color.

To check your skin, looking at the front and back of your body. When examining your own skin, stand in front of a mirror. Examine your skin by following these steps:

1. Raise the arms and examine the right and left sides of the body.

2. Then bend your elbows and look carefully at your forearms, upper underarms and palms.

3. Next, examine the back of your legs, spaces between your toes and your soles.

4. Then, examine those hard‐to see areas like your back, buttocks and the top of your head. Use a mirror to inspect the back of your neck and scalp, parting your hair for a better view.

"Current estimates show one in five Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer in their lifetime, so it's important to be familiar with your skin, especially your moles," said Dr. Rohrer. "Catching skin cancer early is key for successful treatment, so check your skin regularly and see a board-certified dermatologist if you spot anything suspicious."

The American Academy of Dermatology's Body Mole Map (http://www.aad.org/File%20Library/Global%20navigation/For%20the%20public/aad-body-mole-map.pdf) helps people keep a record of moles that are growing, bleeding, itching or changing. The Body Mole Map is a resource of the Academy's SPOT Skin Cancerฎ public awareness initiative. Visitors to the program's website -- www.SpotSkinCancer.org -- also can find stories of those affected by skin cancer and free downloadable materials to educate others in their community.

The "Skin Self-Exam: How to Do" video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iS27V22uNIM) is posted to the Academy's website and YouTube channel. This video is part of the Dermatology A to Z: Video Series, which offers relatable videos that demonstrate tips people can use to properly care for their skin, hair and nails. A new video in the series will be posted to the Academy's website and the YouTube channel each month.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). "How to check your skin for skin cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 October 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121009092418.htm>.
American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). (2012, October 9). How to check your skin for skin cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121009092418.htm
American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). "How to check your skin for skin cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121009092418.htm (accessed August 2, 2014).

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