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Are young people who join social media protests more likely to protest offline too?

Date:
October 17, 2012
Source:
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers
Summary:
Among adults who use social media such as Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and blogs for political purposes, 42% are under the age of 30. A case study of the controversial Budget Repair Bill in Wisconsin explored whether young adults who use social media are more likely to engage in offline protests.
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FULL STORY

Among adults who use social media such as Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and blogs for political purposes, 42% are under the age of 30. A case study of the controversial Budget Repair Bill in Wisconsin explored whether young adults who use social media are more likely to engage in offline protests.The article is available free online on the Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.

Timothy Macafee, University of Wisconsin-Madison, compared the relationship between information-seeking behaviors online versus expressive engagement online (defined as using social media as a "soapbox" to share personal views and political events and issues) and actual participation in political protests.

"Individuals use social media primarily for informational and expressive purposes," Macafee concludes. College students used social media to gain information related to the protests in this case study, but that activity did not affect their offline behavior; whereas, "expressive" political social media use encouraged offline protest participation.

"Using social media for information gathering has quite different implications for real world behavior than does use of social media to express oneself (through blogs, tweets, etc.)," says says Brenda K. Wiederhold, PhD, MBA, BCIA, Editor-in-Chief of Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, from the Interactive Media Institute, San Diego, CA. "As young people utilize social media for information gathering more than traditional means, such as television or newspapers, those wishing to influence opinion and individual behavior should pay heed."


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Timothy Macafee, J.J. De Simone. Killing the Bill Online?: Pathways to Young People's Protest Engagement Via Social Media. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 2012; 120924061216005 DOI: 10.1089/cyber.2012.0153

Cite This Page:

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers. "Are young people who join social media protests more likely to protest offline too?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 October 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121017123749.htm>.
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers. (2012, October 17). Are young people who join social media protests more likely to protest offline too?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121017123749.htm
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publishers. "Are young people who join social media protests more likely to protest offline too?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121017123749.htm (accessed August 29, 2015).

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