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Preterm birth may be prevented with a few proven treatments, experts say

Date:
November 15, 2012
Source:
March of Dimes Foundation
Summary:
Experts have set a target of lowering preterm birth rates by an average of 5 percent across 39 high-resource countries, including the United States, by 2015 to prevent prematurity for 58,000 babies a year.

Lowering preterm birth rates by an average of 5 percent across 39 high-resource countries, including the United States, by 2015 would prevent prematurity for 58,000 babies a year, a group of international experts said on November 15.

In an article published in The Lancet to coincide with the second annual World Prematurity Day, the expert group says prevention of preterm birth also could save billions in economic costs.

"Governments and health professionals in these 39 countries need to know that wider use of proven interventions can help more women have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies," says lead author Hannah H. Chang, M.D., PhD, a consultant for The Boston Consulting Group (BCG). "A 5 percent reduction in the preterm birth rate is an important first step."

"The preterm birth rate in the U.S. currently is on the decline, but for this trend to continue, it's critical that high-resource countries such as ours focus vigorously on prevention," says Christopher Howson, PhD, vice president of Global Programs for the March of Dimes, a co-author.

The authors of The Lancet article say that five proven interventions, when combined, would lower the preterm rate across 39 countries from an average 9.6 percent of live births to 9.1 percent, and save about $3 billion in health and economic costs:

• eliminating early cesarean deliveries and inductions of labor unless medically necessary;

• decreasing multiple embryo transfers during assisted reproductive technologies;

• helping women quit smoking;

• providing progesterone supplementation to women with high risk pregnancies;

• cervical cerclage for high-risk women with short cervix.

"The means to reduce the risk of preterm birth by 5 percent are already available," says Catherine Y. Spong, M.D., Associate Director for Extramural Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. "Continued research into the causes of preterm birth has the potential to reduce the proportion of infants born preterm even further."

Preterm birth, birth before 37 weeks completed gestation, is the leading cause of newborn death, and babies who survive an early birth often face a lifetime of health challenges, including breathing problems, cerebral palsy, motor and intellectual disabilities and others.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by March of Dimes Foundation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Hannah H Chang, Jim Larson, Hannah Blencowe, Catherine Y Spong, Christopher P Howson, Sarah Cairns-Smith, Eve M Lackritz, Shoo K Lee, Elizabeth Mason, Andrew C Serazin, Salimah Walani, Joe Leigh Simpson, Joy E Lawn. Preventing preterm births: analysis of trends and potential reductions with interventions in 39 countries with very high human development index. The Lancet, 2012; DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61856-X

Cite This Page:

March of Dimes Foundation. "Preterm birth may be prevented with a few proven treatments, experts say." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 November 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121115210617.htm>.
March of Dimes Foundation. (2012, November 15). Preterm birth may be prevented with a few proven treatments, experts say. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121115210617.htm
March of Dimes Foundation. "Preterm birth may be prevented with a few proven treatments, experts say." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121115210617.htm (accessed August 20, 2014).

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