Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Psychosocial distress associated with increased stroke risk

Date:
December 13, 2012
Source:
American Heart Association
Summary:
Psychosocial distress is associated with increased risk of stroke deaths and strokes in people over age 65, according to a new study. Psychosocial distress includes depression, stress and a negative outlook and dissatisfaction with life. The impact of psychosocial distress on stroke risk did not differ by race or sex.

People over age 65 with high psychosocial distress face increased risk of stroke , according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Stroke.

Psychosocial distress is a broad concept that includes depression, stress, a negative outlook and dissatisfaction with life.

In their 10-year study, researchers followed 4,120 people in the Chicago Health and Aging Project for rates of death and stroke incidents. Due to some participants being involved in an HMO only 2,649 participants were analyzed for rates of incident stroke. Participants were 65 years and older (average age 77, 62 percent women, 61 percent African American). Researchers identified 151 deaths from stroke and 452 events that led to first-time hospitalization for stroke.

Those with the most psychosocial distress had three times the risk of death from stroke and a 54 percent increased risk of first hospitalization from stroke compared to those least distressed.

The impact of psychosocial distress on stroke risk did not differ by race or by sex, researchers said.

"People should be aware that stress and negative emotions often increase with age," said Susan Everson-Rose, Ph.D., M.P.H., study senior author and associate professor of medicine and associate director of the Program in Health Disparities Research at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. "Family members and caregivers need to recognize these emotions have a profound effect on health."

In a separate analysis, researchers found a striking association between psychosocial distress and risk of hemorrhagic stroke (bleeding), but not ischemic stroke (caused by blood clot).

"There was about 70 percent excess risk for each unit increase in distress that wasn't explained by known stroke risk factors," Everson-Rose said. "So there must be other biologic pathways at play linking distress to hemorrhagic stroke in particular."

The researchers measured psychosocial distress by four indicators: perceived stress, life dissatisfaction, neuroticism and depressive symptoms. They used standardized rating scales to determine the score of each indicator, such as the 6-item Perceived Stress Scale. For each indicator, higher scores represent a higher level of psychosocial distress. A distress factor score was based on averaging the values of the psychosocial measures.

For the study, researchers conducted in-depth interviews in homes in three stable neighborhoods on the south side of Chicago representing African-Americans and Caucasians from the same socio-economic spectrum. The interviews covered medical history, cognitive function, socioeconomic status, behavioral patterns, traditional risk factors for stroke and psychosocial characteristics.

Stroke deaths were verified by the National Death Index and stroke hospitalizations were based on Medicare claims from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

"It's important to pay attention when older people complain of distress and recognize that these symptoms have physical effects on health outcome and clearly affect stroke risk," Everson-Rose said.

Co-authors are: Kimberly Henderson, B.A.; Cari Clark, Sc.D.; Tene Lewis, Ph.D.; Neclum Aggarwal, M.D.; Todd Beck, M.S.; Hongfei Guo, Ph.D.; Scott Lunos, M.S.; Ann Brearley, Ph.D.; Carlos Mendes de Leon, Ph.D.; and Denis Evans, M.D. Author disclosures are on the manuscript.

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute funded the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Heart Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kimberly M. Henderson, Cari J. Clark, Tenι T. Lewis, Neelum T. Aggarwal, Todd Beck, Hongfei Guo, Scott Lunos, Ann Brearley, Carlos F. Mendes de Leon, Denis A. Evans, and Susan A. Everson-Rose. Psychosocial Distress and Stroke Risk in Older Adults. Stroke, 2012; DOI: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.112.679159

Cite This Page:

American Heart Association. "Psychosocial distress associated with increased stroke risk." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 December 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121213172258.htm>.
American Heart Association. (2012, December 13). Psychosocial distress associated with increased stroke risk. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121213172258.htm
American Heart Association. "Psychosocial distress associated with increased stroke risk." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121213172258.htm (accessed July 22, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law

AP (July 22, 2014) — Two federal appeals courts issued conflicting rulings Tuesday on the legality of the federally-run healthcare exchange that operates in 36 states. (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Why Do People Believe We Only Use 10 Percent Of Our Brains?

Newsy (July 22, 2014) — The new sci-fi thriller "Lucy" is making people question whether we really use all our brainpower. But, as scientists have insisted for years, we do. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Scientists Find New Way To Make Human Platelets

Newsy (July 22, 2014) — Boston scientists have discovered a new way to create fully functioning human platelets using a bioreactor and human stem cells. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

Gilead's $1000-a-Pill Drug Could Cure Hep C in HIV-Positive People

TheStreet (July 21, 2014) — New research shows Gilead Science's drug Sovaldi helps in curing hepatitis C in those who suffer from HIV. In a medical study, the combination of Gilead's Hep C drug with anti-viral drug Ribavirin cured 76% of HIV-positive patients suffering from the most common hepatitis C strain. Hepatitis C and related complications have been a top cause of death in HIV-positive patients. Typical medication used to treat the disease, including interferon proteins, tended to react badly with HIV drugs. However, Sovaldi's %1,000-a-pill price tag could limit the number of patients able to access the treatment. TheStreet's Keris Lahiff reports from New York. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins